Etymology
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liftoff (n.)

also lift-off, "vertical take-off of a rocket, etc.," 1956, American English, from the verbal phrase, from lift (v.) + off (adv.). Earlier, of aircraft, simply lift (1879). Figurative use from 1967.

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boost (v.)

"to lift or raise by pushing from behind," 1815, literal and figurative, American English, a word of unknown origin. Related: Boosted; boosting. As a noun, "a lift, a shove up, an upward push," by 1825.

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heft (v.)

"to lift, try the weight of," 1660s, from heft (n.). Related: Hefted; hefting.

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uplift (v.)

mid-14c., from up (adv.) + lift (v.). Related: Uplifted; uplifting.

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ladle (v.)

"to lift or dip with a ladle," 1758, from ladle (n.). Related: Ladled; ladling.

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anagogical (adj.)

"having a secondary, spiritual sense" (of Scripture, etc.), 1520s, with -ical + Greek anagogē "elevation; spiritual or mystical enlightenment," from anagein "to lead up, lift up," from ana "up" (see ana-) + agein "to lead, put in motion" (from PIE root *ag- "to drive, draw out or forth, move").

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shoplifter (n.)

"one who purloins goods from a shop while posing as a customer," 1670s, from shop (n.) + agent noun of lift (v.). Also as nouns in the same sense were shop-lift (1670s); shop-thief.

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liftback (n.)

in reference to a type of hatchback automobile, 1973, from lift (v.) + back (n.).

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