Etymology
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digamma (n.)

1550s, "the letter F;" 1690s as the name of a former letter in the Greek alphabet, corresponding to -F- (apparently originally pronounced with the force of English consonantal -w-), from Latin digamma "F," from Greek digamma, literally "double gamma" (because it resembles two gammas, one atop the other). The sixth letter of the original Greek alphabet, it corresponded to Semitic waw.

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jot (n.)
"the least part of anything," 1520s, from Latin iota, from Greek iota "the letter -i-," the smallest letter in the Greek alphabet, also "the least part of anything" (see iota). Usually (and originally) with tittle, from Matthew v.18.
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eta (n.)
Greek letter, originally the name of the aspirate, from Phoenician heth.
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phi 
twenty-first letter of the Greek alphabet; see ph.
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pion (n.)

type of subatomic particle, 1951, from Greek letter pi + -on.

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lambda (n.)
Greek letter name, from a Semitic source akin to Hebrew lamedh.
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yod (n.)
10th and smallest letter of the Hebrew alphabet (compare jot, iota).
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zee (n.)
"the letter Z," 1670s, now more common in American English.
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grammatolatry (n.)
"concern for the letter (of Scripture) without regard for the spirit," 1847 (German Grammatolatrie is attested by 1842), from Latinized form of Greek grammatik-, combining form of gramma "letter" (see -gram) + -latry "worship of." Probably formed with allusion to idolatry.
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brevet (n.)
mid-14c., from Old French brievet "letter, note, piece of paper; papal indulgence" (13c.), diminutive of bref "letter, note" (see brief (n.)). Military sense of "a commission to a higher rank without advance in command" (for meritorious service, etc.) is from 1680s.
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