Etymology
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bedtime (n.)

also bed-time, "the usual hour of going to rest," early 13c., from bed (n.) + time (n.). Bed-time story is attested from 1867.

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longtime (adj.)

also long-time, 1580s, from long (adj.) + time (n.).

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temporal (adj.)

late 14c., "worldly, secular;" also "terrestrial, earthly; temporary, lasting only for a time," from Old French temporal "earthly," and directly from Latin temporalis "of time, denoting time; but for a time, temporary," from tempus (genitive temporis) "time, season, moment, proper time or season," from Proto-Italic *tempos- "stretch, measure," which according to de Vaan is from PIE *temp-os "stretched," from root *ten- "to stretch," the notion being "stretch of time." Related: Temporally.

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tense (n.)

"form of a verb showing time of an action or state," early 14c., tens "time," also "tense of a verb" (late 14c.), from Old French tens "time, period of time, era; occasion, opportunity; weather" (11c., Modern French temps), from Latin tempus "a portion of time" (also source of Spanish tiempo, Italian tempo; see temporal).

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isochronous (adj.)

"uniform in time, of equal time, performed in equal times," 1706, with suffix -ous, from Modern Latin isochronus, from Greek isokhronos "equal in age or time," from iso- "equal" (see iso-) + khronos "time" (see chrono-). Earlier in same sense was isochronal (1670s).

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temporary (adj.)

"lasting only for a time," 1540s, from Latin temporarius "of seasonal character, lasting a short time," from tempus (genitive temporis) "time, season" (see temporal, late 14c., which was the earlier word for "lasting but for a time"). The noun meaning "person employed only for a time" is recorded from 1848. Related: Temporarily; temporariness.

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springtime (n.)

also spring-time, late 15c., from spring (n.1) + time (n.).

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chrono- 

before vowels chron-, word-forming element meaning "time," from Latinized form of Greek khronos "time, a defined time, a lifetime, a season, a while," which is of uncertain origin.

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temporality (n.)

late 14c., "temporal power," from Late Latin temporalitas, from temporalis "of a time, but for a time" (see temporal).

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anachronism (n.)

1640s, "an error in computing time or finding dates," from Latin anachronismus, from Greek anakhronismos, from anakhronizein "refer to wrong time," from ana "against" (see ana-) + khronos "time" (see chrono-). The meaning "something out of harmony with a specified time" is recorded by 1816.

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