Etymology
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Mahn 

on this site, a reference to Carl August Friedrich Mahn (1802-1887), German philologist and etymologist who helped write the etymologies in the 1864 Webster's Dictionary.

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shoreland (n.)

"land bordering the shore," by 1807, from shore (n.) + land (n.).

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Lateran 

c. 1300, popular name of the cathedral church of St. John Lateran at Rome, which is built on the site of the palace of the Plautii Laterani, a Roman family. Given by Constantine to the bishop of Rome, as a papal headquarters and residence for nearly 1,000 years it was the site of five general councils of the Western Church, that of 1215 being regarded as most important. The Lateran Accords of 1929 settled the relationship between Italy and the Holy See.

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Ascot 

village near Windsor, Berkshire, literally "eastern cottage." The site of fashionable horse race meetings, hence its use attributively for clothes suitable for the event; especially a type of tie (1889).

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Charterhouse 

great English public school founded in London in 1611, a folk etymology alteration of chartreux (see chartreuse); so called because it was founded upon the site of a Carthusian monastery.

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parkland (n.)

1907, "grassland with scattered trees;" by 1937 as "land used for a park," from park (n.) + land (n.).

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terrain (n.)

1727, "ground for training horses," from French terrain "piece of earth, ground, land," from Old French (12c.), from Vulgar Latin *terranum, from Latin terrenum "land, ground," noun use of neuter of terrenus "of earth, earthly," from terra "earth, land," literally "dry land" (as opposed to "sea"); from PIE root *ters- "to dry." Meaning "tract of country, considered with regard to its natural features" first attested 1766.

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landsman (n.)

1590s, "man of the same country," from genitive of land (n.) + man (n.). From 1660s as "one who lives on land and has little experience of the sea."

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overland (adv.)

"over or across the country," 1580s, from over- + land (n.). As an adjective, "made, done, or lying upon or across the land," by 1800.

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landlady (n.)

"woman who owns a house or land occupied by tenants, 1520s, from land (n.) + lady.

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