Etymology
Advertisement
kine (n.)

archaic plural of cow (n.); a double plural (compare children) or genitive plural of Middle English kye "cows," from Old English cy (genitive cyna), plural of cu "cow." The old theory that it represents a contraction of Old English cowen has been long discarded.

The Old Testament kine of Bashan, railed against in Amos 4:1-3 because they "oppress the poor," "crush the needy," and "say to their masters, Bring and let us drink," usually are said to be a figure for the voluptuous and luxuriously wanton women of Samaria, "though some scholars prefer to see this as a reference to the effeminate character of the wealthy rulers of the land" ["The K.J.V. Parallel Bible Commentary," 1994]. The word there translated Hebrew parah "cow, heifer." The cows of Bashan, east of the Sea of Galilee, grazed in lush pastures and were notably well-fed and strong beasts.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
kinema (n.)
former alternative spelling of cinema, with the Greek k-.
Related entries & more 
kingfish (n.)
1750, a name given to various types of fish deemed exceptionally large or tasty; see king (adj.) + fish (n.). From 1933 as the nickname of U.S. politician Huey Long (1893-1935) of Louisiana.
Related entries & more 
kink (v.)
1690s (intransitive), 1800 (transitive), from kink (n.). Related: Kinked; kinking.
Related entries & more 
kinesthetic (adj.)

also kinaesthetic, "pertaining to kinesthesia," 1880, coined by British neurologist Henry Charlton Bastian (1837-1915) from Greek kinein "to move" (from PIE root *keie- "to set in motion") + aisthēsis "sensation" (from PIE root *au- "to perceive"). The coinage is perhaps on model of aesthetic, prosthetic.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
one-of-a-kind (adj.)

"unique," 1961, from the adverbial phrase; see one + kind (n.).

Related entries & more 
kinetics (n.)
"science of motion and forces acting on bodies in motion," 1864, from kinetic; see -ics.
Related entries & more 
kinesis (n.)

"physical movement, muscular action," 1819, from Greek kinēsis "movement, motion," from kinein "to move," from PIE *kie-neu-, suffixed form of root *keie- "set in motion."

Related entries & more 
kinesics (n.)

study of body language, 1952, from Greek kinēsis "movement, motion," from kinein "to move" (from PIE root *keie- "to set in motion") + -ics. Related: kinesic.

Related entries & more 
kingdom (n.)
Old English cyningdom; see king (n.) + -dom. Cognate with Old Saxon kuningdom, Middle Dutch koninghdom, Old Norse konungdomr. The usual Old English word was cynedom; Middle English also had kingrick (for second element, see the first element in Reichstag). Meaning "one of the realms of nature" is from 1690s.

Kingdom-come (n.) "the next world, the hereafter" (1785), originally slang, is from the Lord's Prayer, where it is an archaic simple present subjunctive ("may Thy kingdom come") in reference to the spiritual reign of God or Christ.
Related entries & more 

Page 6