Etymology
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junker (n.)
"young German noble," 1550s, from German Junker, from Old High German juncherro, literally "young lord," from junc "young" (see young (adj.)) + herro "lord" (see Herr). Pejorative sense of "reactionary younger member of the Prussian aristocracy" (1865) is from Bismarck's domestic policy. Related: Junkerism. Meaning "drug addict" is from 1922; that of "old worn-out automobile" is from 1969, both from junk (n.1).
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*ger- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to gather." 

It forms all or part of: aggregate; aggregation; agora; agoraphobia; allegory; category; congregate; cram; egregious; gregarious; panegyric; paregoric; segregate.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit gramah "heap, troop;" Greek ageirein "to assemble," agora "assembly;" Latin grex "flock, herd," gremium "bosom, lap;" Old Church Slavonic grusti "handful," gramota "heap;" Lithuanian gurgulys "chaos, confusion," gurguolė "crowd, mass;" Old English crammian "press something into something else."

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rockpile (n.)

also rock-pile, "heap of stones," originally and especially one in a prison yard that convicts are tasked with breaking into smaller stones, 1888, from rock (n.1) + pile (n.1).

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ingest (v.)
1610s, "to take in as food," from Latin ingestus, past participle of ingerere "to throw in, pour in, heap upon," from in- "into" (from PIE root *en "in") + gerere "to carry" (see gest). Related: Ingested; ingesting.
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exaggeration (n.)
Origin and meaning of exaggeration

"unreasonable or extravagant amplification," 1560s, from Latin exaggerationem (nominative exaggeratio) "elevation, exaltation" (figurative), noun of action from past-participle stem of exaggerare "amplify, magnify," literally "heap up" (see exaggerate).

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clutter (v.)

1550s, "to collect in heaps, crowd together in disorder," variant of clotern "to form clots, to heap on" (c. 1400); related to clot (n.), and perhaps influenced by cluster. Sense of "to litter, to crowd (a place) by a disorderly mass of things" is first recorded 1660s. Related: Cluttered; cluttering.

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rick (n.)

"stack of hay, straw, etc.," especially if regularly built and thatched to keep off rain, Middle English reke, from Old English hreac, from Proto-Germanic *khraukaz (source also of Old Norse hraukr, Frisian reak, Dutch rook "heap"); perhaps related to ridge (n.).

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rake (n.1)

"toothed tool for drawing or scraping things together," Old English raca "rake," earlier ræce, from Proto-Germanic *rak- "gather, heap up" (source also of Old Norse reka "spade, shovel," Old High German rehho, German Rechen "a rake," Gothic rikan "to heap up, collect"), from PIE root *reg- "move in a straight line," with derivatives meaning "to direct in a straight line," thus "to lead, rule" (source also of Greek oregein "to reach, stretch out," Latin regere "direct, rule; keep straight, guide"). The implement is so called perhaps via its action, or via the notion of "implement with straight pieces of wood" [Watkins].

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encumber (v.)
early 14c., "burden, vex, inconvenience," from Old French encombrer "to block up, hinder, thwart," from Late Latin incombrare, from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + combrus "barricade, obstacle," probably from Latin cumulus "heap" (see cumulus). Meaning "hinder, hamper" is attested in English from late 14c. Related: Encumbered; encumbering.
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conglomerate (adj.)

"gathered into a ball or rounded mass," 1570s, from Latin conglomeratus, past participle of conglomerare "to roll together, concentrate, heap up," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + glomerare "to gather into a ball, collect," from glomus (genitive glomeris) "a ball, ball-shaped mass," possibly from PIE *glem- (see glebe).

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