Etymology
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scaramouche (n.)

1660s, name of a cowardly braggart (supposed by some to represent a Spanish don) in traditional Italian comedy, from Italian Scaramuccia, literally "skirmish," from schermire "to fence," from a Germanic source (such as Old High German skirmen "defend"); see skirmish (n.). According to OED, a vogue word in late 17c. London due to the popularity of the character as staged there by Italian actor Tiberio Fiurelli (1608-1694).

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si 
"yes" in Italian and Spanish; from Latin sic "so" (see sic).
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figurine (n.)
"small, ornamental human representation in pottery or other material work," 1854, from French figurine (16c.), from Italian figurina, diminutive of figura, from Latin figura "shape, form, figure" (from PIE root *dheigh- "to form, build"). Figurette is from 1850, from Italian.
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Guido 
masc. proper name, Italian, literally "leader," of Germanic origin (see guide (v.)). As a type of gaudy machoism often associated with Italian-Americans, 1980s, teen slang, from the name of character in Hollywood film "Risky Business" (1983).
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architrave (n.)
1560s as a feature of architectural columns; 1660s of window parts, from Italian architrave, from Latin archi- "beginning, origin" (see archon) + Italian trave "beam," from Latin trabem (nominative trabs) "beam, timber," from PIE root *treb- "dwelling" (see tavern).
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Cosa Nostra 

1963, "the Mafia in America," Italian, literally "this thing of ours."

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tagliatelle (n.)
1876, from Italian tagliatelle, plural noun from tagliare "to cut" (see entail).
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oz. 
abbreviation of ounce (n.1), 1540s, from Italian oz. (15c.), abbreviation of onza.
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terrazzo (n.)
type of flooring material, 1893, from Italian terrazzo "terrace, balcony" (see terrace).
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anti-fascist (adj.)
1923, in names of organizations of Italian workers in the U.S., from anti- + fascist.
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