Etymology
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Eisenhower 
surname, from German Eisenhauer, literally "iron-cutter, iron-hewer," "perhaps based on Fr. Taillefer" [George F. Jones, "German-American Names," 3rd ed., 2006]. See iron (n.) + hew (v.).
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irons (n.)
"iron shackles or fetters," mid-14c., plural of iron (n.).
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ferromagnetic (adj.)
"behaving like iron in a magnetic field," 1840, from ferro- "iron" + magnetic.
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locket (n.)
mid-14c., "iron cross-bar of a window," from Old French loquet "door-handle, bolt, latch, fastening" (14c.), diminutive of loc "lock, latch," from Frankish or some other Germanic source (compare Old Norse lok "fastening, lock;" see lock (n.1)). Meaning "little ornamental case with hinged cover" (containing a lock of hair, miniature portrait, etc.) first recorded 1670s. Italian lucchetto also is from Germanic.
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cauterize (v.)

"to burn or sear (morbid flesh) with a hot iron," c. 1400, from Old French cauterisier, from Late Latin cauterizare "to burn or brand with a hot iron," from Greek kauteriazein, from kauter "burning or branding iron," from kaiein "to burn," a word of uncertain origin. Related: Cauterized; cauterizing.

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hybridization (n.)

"cross-fertilization, cross-breeding; act or process of hybridizing; state of being hybridized," 1824, noun of action from hybridize.

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ferro- 
before vowels ferr-, word-forming element indicating the presence of or derivation from iron, from Latin ferro-, combining form of ferrum "iron," which is of unknown origin. Possibly of Semitic origin, via Etruscan [Klein]; Watkins suggests "possibly borrowed (via Etruscan) from the same obscure source as OE bræs "brass." Also sometimes especially indicative of the presence of iron in the ferrous state; ferri- indicating iron in the ferric state.
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crosswise (adv.)

"in the shape of a cross, crisscross, crossing perpendicularly," late 14c.; see cross- + wise (n.).

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crucifix (n.)

"a cross or representation of a cross with the crucified figure of Christ upon in," early 13c., from Old French crucefix (12c., Modern French crucifix), from Latin cruci fixus "(one) fixed to the cross" (see crucify).

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recross (v.)

also re-cross, "pass over again," late 15c., from re- "back, again" + cross (v.). Related: Recrossed; recrossing.

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