Etymology
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decompose (v.)

1750s, "to separate into components," from de- "opposite of" + compose (v.) in the sense of "make or form by uniting two or more things." Sense of "putrefy, become resolved into constituent elements" is by 1777. Related: Decomposed; decomposing.

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crystallized (adj.)

c. 1600, "made into crystal;" 1660s, "formed into crystals," past-participle adjective from crystallize. Of fruit, etc., "preserved by sugar (and usually coated with sugar crystals), by 1875.

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penetralia (n.)

"inmost parts or recesses of a building," especially a temple or shrine, 1660s, from Latin plural of penetral, from penetralis "interior," from the stem of penetrare "to put or get into, enter into" (see penetrate).

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versify (v.)

late 14c., "compose verse, write poetry, make verses," from Old French versifier "turn into verse" (13c.), from Latin versificare "compose verse; put into verse," from versus "verse" (see verse) + combining form of facere "to make" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"). Transitive sense of "put into verse" in English is from 1735. Related: Versified; versifying; versifier (mid-14c.).

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unhinged (adj.)

"thrown into confusion," 1719, past-participle adjective from unhinge.

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enisle (v.)

c. 1600, from en- (1) "in, into" + isle (n.).

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plop (v.)

"to fall or fall into with a sound like 'plop,' " 1821, imitative of the sound of a smooth object dropping into water. Related: Plopped; plopping. Thackary (mid-19c.) used plap (v.). As a noun from 1833.

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puree (v.)

"to make into a puree," 1934, from puree (n.). Related: Pureed.

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asunder (adv.)

"into a position apart, separate, into separate parts," mid-12c., a contraction of Old English on sundran (see a- (1) + sunder). Middle English used to know asunder for "distinguish, tell apart."

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isagoge (n.)

1650s, from Latin isagoge, from Greek eisagoge "an introduction (into court), importation (of goods)," from eis "into" + agoge "a leading," from agein "to lead" (from PIE root *ag- "to drive, draw out or forth, move"). Related: Isagogic; isagogical (1520s); Isagogics.

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