Etymology
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hottie (n.)
also hotty, "attractive person," teen slang by 1995, from hot + -ie. The same word was used from 1947 with sense "hot water bottle."
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scald (v.)

c. 1200, scalden, "to be very hot;" also "to affect (someone) painfully by short exposure to hot liquid or steam," from Old North French escalder "to scald, to scorch" (Old French eschalder "heat, boil up, bubble," Modern French échauder), from Late Latin excaldare "bathe in hot water" (source also of Spanish escaldar, Italian scaldare "heat with hot water"), from Latin ex "out, out of" (see ex-) + calidus "hot" (from PIE root *kele- (1) "warm"). Related: Scalded; scalding.

"[T]he word entered at an early date into the Scandinavian languages" [OED]. The noun is c. 1600, from the verb, "burn or injury to the skin by hot liquid or steam."

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arr (v.)
"to growl like a dog," late 15c., imitative. In classical times, the letter R was called littera canina "the dog letter" (Persius).
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Weimaraner (n.)
dog breed, 1943, from Weimar, german city, + German suffix -aner indicating "of this place." Originally bred as a hunting dog in the Weimar region.
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underdog (n.)

"the beaten dog in a fight," 1887, from under + dog (n.). Compare top dog "dominant person in a situation or hierarchy" (see top (adj.)). Its opposite, overdog, is attested by 1908.

I'm a poor underdog
But tonight I will bark
With the great Overdog
That romps through the dark.
[from "Canis Major," Robert Frost, 1928] 
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thermo- 
before vowels therm-, word-forming element meaning "hot, heat, temperature," used in scientific and technical words, from Greek thermos "hot, warm," therme "heat" (from PIE root *gwher- "to heat, warm").
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canaille (n.)
"the rabble, the lowest order of people collectively," 1670s, from French canaille (16c.), from Italian canaglia, literally "a pack of dogs," from cane "dog," from Latin canis (from PIE root *kwon- "dog").
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dingo (n.)

the Australian dog, of wolf-like appearance and very fierce, 1789, Native Australian name, from Dharruk (language formerly spoken in the area of Sydney) /din-go/ "tame dog," though the English used it to describe wild Australian dogs. Bushmen continue to call the animal by the Dharruk term /warrigal/ "wild dog." Plural dingoes.

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hotbed (n.)
also hot-bed, 1620s, "bed of earth heated by fermenting manure for growing early plants," from hot (adj.) + bed (n.). Generalized sense of "place that fosters rapid growth" is from 1768.
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canid (n.)
"a carnivorous mammal of the Canidae family" (dogs, wolves, foxes, jackals), 1879, from Modern Latin Canidae, from Latin canis "dog" (from PIE root *kwon- "dog") + -idae.
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