Etymology
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hierocracy (n.)
"rule or government by priests," 1794, from hiero-, from Greek hieros "sacred, holy, divine" (see ire) + -cracy "rule or government by." Related: Hierocratic.
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saintly (adj.)

"like or characteristic of a saint, befitting a holy person," 1620s, from saint (n.) + -ly (1). Middleton used saintish; Dryden has saintlike. Related: Saintlily; saintliness.

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blessed (adj.)
late 12c., "supremely happy," also "consecrated, holy" (c. 1200), past-participle adjective from bless (v.). Reversed or ironic sense of "cursed, damned" is recorded from 1806. Related: Blessedly; blessedness.
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liturgy (n.)

1550s, Liturgy, "the service of the Holy Eucharist," from French liturgie (16c.) or directly from Late Latin/Medieval Latin liturgia "public service, public worship," from Greek leitourgia "a liturgy; public duty, ministration, ministry," from leitourgos "one who performs a public ceremony or service, public servant," from leito- "public" (from laos "people;" compare leiton "public hall," leite "priestess;" see lay (adj.)) + -ourgos "that works," from ergon "work" (from PIE root *werg- "to do"). Meaning "collective formulas for the conduct of divine service in Christian churches" is from 1590s. Related: Liturgist; liturgics.

In ancient Greece, particularly at Athens, a form of personal service to the state which citizens possessing property to a certain amount were bound, when called upon, to perform at their own cost. These liturgies were ordinary, including the presentation of dramatic performances, musical and poetic contests, etc., the celebration of some festivals, and other public functions entailing expense upon the incumbent; or extraordinary, as the fitting out of a trireme In case of war. [Century Dictionary]
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ghostly (adj.)
Old English gastlic "spiritual, holy, not of the flesh; clerical;" also "supernatural, spectral, pertaining to or characteristic of a ghost;" see ghost (n.) + -ly (1). Related: Ghostliness.
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sprite (n.)
c. 1300, "Holy Ghost," from Old French esprit "spirit," from Latin spiritus (see spirit (n.)). From mid-14c. as "immaterial being; angel, demon, elf, fairy; apparition, ghost."
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Redemptorist (n.)

member of the Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer (founded Naples, 1732, by St. Alphonsus Liguori), 1835 in English; see redemption. Noted for their missionary work among the poor. Fem. form is Redemptoristine.

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maharishi (n.)
Hindu sage or holy man, 1785, from Sanskrit, from maha "great" (from PIE root *meg- "great") + rishi "inspired sage." In general use, a title for a popular spiritual leader.
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really (adv.)

c. 1400, "actually, in fact, in a real manner," originally in reference to the presence of Christ in the Eucharist, "substantially," from real (adj.) + -ly (2). The general sense is from early 15c. Purely emphatic use dates from c. 1600, "indeed," sometimes as a corroboration, sometimes as an expression of surprise or a term of protest; interrogative use (as in oh, really?) is recorded from 1815.

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Nemean (adj.)

1580s, "pertaining to Nemea," a wooded valley in the northern Argolis, from Greek nemos "grove, forest," from PIE *nemos (source also of Latin nemus "forest, (holy) wood" and the Celtic word for "(holy) wood, sanctuary" preserved in Gaulish nemeton, Old Irish nemed). Especially in reference to the lion there, which was said to have been killed by Herakles as one of his 12 labors. The Nemean Games were one of the four great national festivals of the ancient Greeks. The victor's garland was made of parsley.

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