Etymology
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exhibit (n.)

1620s, "document or object produced as evidence in court," from Latin exhibitum, noun use of neuter past participle of exhibere "to display, show," "to show, display, present," literally "hold out, hold forth," from ex "out" (see ex-) + habere "to hold" (from PIE root *ghabh- "to give or receive"). Meaning "object displayed in a fair, museum, etc." is from 1862. Transferred use of exhibit A "important piece of evidence" is by 1906.

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*dlegh- 

Proto-Indo-European root found in Celtic, Germanic, Slavic, and possibly Latin, meaning "to engage oneself, be or become fixed."

It forms all or part of: indulge; indulgence; play; pledge; plight (v.) "to pledge;" replevin.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit drmha-, drhya- "to fix, make firm;" Old Avestan derez- "fetter;" Gaulish delgu "to hold," Middle Welsh dala "to hold," Old Breton delgim "to hold;" Old Saxon plegan "vouch for," Gothic tulgjan "to fasten."

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Amy 

fem. proper name, from Old French Amee, literally "beloved," from fem. past participle of amer "to love," from Latin amare "to love, be in love with; find pleasure in," Proto-Italic *ama- "to take, hold," from a PIE root meaning "take hold of," also the source of Sanskrit amisi, amanti "take hold of; swear;" Avestan *ama- "attacking power;" Greek omnymi "to swear," anomotos "under oath;" Old Irish namae "enemy." According to de Vaan, "The Latin meaning has developed from 'to take the hand of' [to] 'regard as a friend'."

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continence (n.)

late 14c., "self-restraint, moderation," especially with regard to desires and passions, "moderation in sexual intercourse, chastity, restraint of the sexual passions within lawful bounds," from Old French continence (14c.) and directly from Latin continentia "a holding back, repression," abstract noun from continent-, present-participle stem of continere "to hold back, check," also "hold together, enclose," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + tenere "to hold" (from PIE root *ten- "to stretch").

In reference to the body's eliminatory functions, from 1915. Related: Continency.

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inhibition (n.)

late 14c., "formal prohibition; interdiction of legal proceedings by authority;" also, the document setting forth such a prohibition, from Old French inibicion and directly from Latin inhibitionem (nominative inhibitio) "a restraining," from past participle stem of inhibere "to hold in, hold back, keep back," from in- "in, on" (from PIE root *en "in") + habere "to hold" (from PIE root *ghabh- "to give or receive"). Psychological sense of "involuntary check on an expression of an impulse" is from 1876.

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hug (n.)

1610s, a hold in wrestling, from hug (v.). Meaning "an affectionate embrace" is from 1650s.

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mouthful (n.)

early 15c., "as much as a mouth can hold," from mouth (n.) + -ful. Meaning "a lot to say" is from 1748.

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prohibit (v.)

"forbid, interdict by authority," early 15c., prohibiten, from Latin prohibitus, past participle of prohibere "hold back, restrain, hinder, prevent," from pro "away, forth" (see pro-) + habere "to hold" (from PIE root *ghabh- "to give or receive"). For form, compare inhibit, exhibit. Related: Prohibited; prohibiting.

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bagful (n.)

"as much as a bag will hold," c. 1300, bagge-ful, from bag (n.) + -ful.

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glassful (n.)

Old English glæsful "as much as a glass will hold;" see glass (n.) + -ful.

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