Etymology
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dene (n.1)

"small thickly wooded valley," from Old English denu "valley" (see den). Confused in Middle English with den. In Middle English down and dene meant "hill and dale."

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acclivity (n.)
Origin and meaning of acclivity
"upward slope of ground," 1610s, from Latin acclivitatem (nominative acclivitas) "an ascending direction, rising grade, upward steepness," from acclivis "mounting upwards, ascending," from ad "to, up to" (see ad-) + clivus "hill, a slope," from PIE *klei-wo-, suffixed form of root *klei- "to lean."
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Brie (n.)

type of soft, salted, white cream-cheese, 1848, from name of a district in department Seine-et-Marne, southeast of Paris, famous for its cheeses. The name is from Gaulish briga "hill, height."

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mount (n.1)

"mountain, lofty hill, elevation of land," late Old English, from Anglo-French mount, Old French mont "mountain;" also perhaps partly from Old English munt "mountain;" both the Old English and the French words from Latin montem (nominative mons) "mountain," from PIE root *men- (2) "to stand out, project." "From the 17th c. in prose used chiefly of a more or less conical hill of moderate height rising from a plain; a hillock" [OED]. Archaic or poetic only by late 19c. except as part of a proper name. The Sermon on the Mount is in Matthew v-vii and Luke vi.

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Snowdon 
mountain in Caernarvonshire, northern Wales, from English snow (n.) + Old English dun "hill, mountain" (see down (n.2); presumably translating a former Celtic name. The height is snow-covered much of the year.
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howe (n.)
also how, "artificial burial mound," 1660s, from a local word in northern England for a hill or hillock, from a Middle English use of Old Norse haugr "mound; cairn," perhaps from the root of high (adj.).
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*bhergh- (2)
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "high," with derivatives referring to hills and hill-forts.

It forms all or part of: barrow (n.2) "mound, hill, grave-mound;" belfry; borough; bourgeoisie; burg; burgess; burgher; burglar; faubourg; iceberg.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit b'rhant "high," brmhati "strengthens, elevates;" Avestan brzant- "high," Old Persian bard- "be high;" Greek Pergamos, name of the citadel of Troy; Old Church Slavonic bregu "mountain, height;" Old Irish brigh "mountain;" Welsh bera "stack, pyramid."
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crucifixion (n.)

"the putting to death of Christ on the hill of Calvary," early 15c., crucifixioun, from Late Latin crucifixionem (nominative crucifixio), noun of action from past-participle stem of crucifigere "kill by crucifixion; fasten to a cross" (see crucify).

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puy (n.)

"conical volcanic hill," especially those in Auvergne, 1858, from French puy, from Latin podium "a height, balcony," literally "support" (see podium). The volcanoes were active from c. 95,000 to 10,000 years before the present.

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Zion 
late Old English Sion, from Greek Seon, from Hebrew Tsiyon, name of a Canaanite hill fortress in Jerusalem captured by David and called in the Bible "City of David." It became the center of Jewish life and worship.
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