Etymology
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headwaters (n.)

attested 1530s, then not again until 1792 (in descriptions of Kentucky), so possibly the modern word is a re-formation; see head (n.) "origin of a river" + water (n.1).

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heady (adj.)

late 14c., "headstrong, hasty, impetuous," from head (n.) + adj. suffix -y (2). First recorded 1570s in sense of "apt to go to the head." Related: Headily; headiness.

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snakehead (n.)

1845 as a type of plant; 1891 as a type of Asian carnivorous fish," from snake (n.) + head (n.).

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greenhead (n.)

1580s, "young, untrained intellect," from green (adj.) + head (n.). As a type of biting fly with a green-colored head, by 1837.

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fountainhead (n.)

also fountain-head, "spring from which a stream flows," 1580s, from fountain + head (n.). Figurative use is from c. 1600.

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warhead (n.)

also war-head, 1898, "explosive part of a torpedo," from war (n.) + head (n.). Later transferred to any missile (1944).

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towhead (n.)

also tow-head, in reference to tousled blond hair, 1830, from tow (n.1) + head (n.). Related: Towheaded.

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raghead (n.)

insulting term for "South Asian or Middle Eastern person," 1910, from rag (n.1) + head (n.); in reference to turbans, etc.

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pothead (n.)

also pot-head "chronic marijuana user," 1967, from pot (n.2) + head (n.). Earlier it meant "stupid person" (1530s), from pot (n.1).

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letter-head (n.)

also letterhead, "sheet of paper with a printed or engraved logo or address," 1868, short for letterheading (1867); from letter (n.1) + heading (n.) in the printing sense. So called because it was printed at the "head" of the sheet of paper.

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