Etymology
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rurban (adj.)

1918, a blend of rural and urban coined in reference to areas that have elements of both. Compare suburban.

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command (v.)

c. 1300, "order or direct with authority" (transitive), from Old French comander "to order, enjoin, entrust" (12c., Modern French commander), from Vulgar Latin *commandare, from Latin commendare "to recommend, entrust to" (see commend); altered by influence of Latin mandare "to commit, entrust" (see mandate (n.)). In this sense Old English had bebeodan.

Intransitive sense "act as or have authority of a commander, have or exercise supreme power" is from late 14c. Also from late 14c. as "have within the range of one's influence" (of resources, etc.), hence, via a military sense, "have a view of, overlook" in reference to elevated places (1690s). Related: Commanded; commanding.

Command-post "headquarters of a military unit" is from 1918. A command performance (1863) is one given by royal command.

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superintend (v.)

"to have charge and direction of," 1610s, from Church Latin superintendere "to oversee" (see superintendent). Related: Superintended; superintending.

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outgun (v.)

"to surpass in guns, have more firepower than," 1690s, from out- + gun. Related: Outgunned; outgunning.

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Chihuahua (n.)

 city and state in Mexico, said to be from a lost native word that meant "dry place." The dog breed is attested by that name from 1854, though such dogs seem to have been bred there long before. Early American explorers in the west seem to have confused the somewhat with prairie dogs.

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merry widow 

"amorous or designing widow," 1907, from the English title of Franz Lehar's operetta "Die Lustige Witwe" (1905). "The Lusty Widow" would have been more etymological (see lust (n.)), but would have given the wrong impression in English. Meaning "a type of wide-brimmed hat" (popularized in the play) is attested from 1908.

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varnish (v.)

late 14c.; see varnish (n.). Related: Varnished; varnishing. Century Dictionary defines varnishing day as "A day before the opening of a picture exhibition on which exhibitors have the privilege of retouching or varnishing their pictures after they have been placed on the walls." The custom is said to date to the early years of 19c.

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misconceive (v.)

late 14c., "to have a wrong notion of, misunderstand," from mis- (1) "badly, wrongly" + conceive. Related: Misconceived; misconceiving.

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snogging (n.)

"kissing and cuddling," British English slang, 1945, of unknown origin, said to have originated in British India.

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abominate (v.)

"abhor, loathe," 1640s, a back-formation from abomination or else from Latin abominatus, past participle of abominari "shun as an ill omen." Related: Abominated; abominating. Middle English had noun, adjective, and adverb but seems to have lacked the verb. The Old French verb, abominer "to loathe" is said to have fallen out of use since 16c.

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