Etymology
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cock (v.)

mid-12c., cocken, "to fight;" 1570s, "to swagger;" 1640s as "to raise or draw back the hammer or cock of a gun or pistol as a preliminary to firing." Seeming contradictory modern senses of "to turn or stand up, turn to one side" (as in cock one's ear), c. 1600, and "to bend" (1898) are from the two cock nouns. The first is probably in reference to the posture of the bird's head or tail, the second to the firearm position.

To cock one's hat carries the notion of "defiant boastfulness." But a cocked hat(1670s) is merely one with a turned-up brim, such as military and naval officers wore on full dress occasions.

To go off half-cocked in the figurative sense "speak or act too hastily" (1833) is in allusion to firearms going off unexpectedly when supposedly secure; half-cocked in a literal sense "with the cock lifted to the first catch, at which position the trigger does not act" is recorded by 1750. In 1770 it was noted as a synonym for "drunk." 

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Panama 

Central American nation; the name is used of a political jurisdiction by 1530s in Spanish, probably from an unknown Guarani word, traditionally said to mean "place of many fish." Originally the name of the settlement founded 1519 (destroyed 1671 but subsequently rebuilt). Related: Panamanian. Panama hat, made from the leaves of the screw pine, is attested from 1833, a misnomer, because it originally was made in Ecuador, but perhaps so called in American English because it was distributed north from Panama City. Panama red as a variety of Central American marijuana is attested from 1967.

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pith (n.)

Old English piþa "central cylinder of the stems of plants," also, figuratively, "essential part, quintessence, condensed substance," from West Germanic *pithan- (source also of Middle Dutch pitte, Dutch pit, East Frisian pit), a Low German root of uncertain origin. Figurative sense of "energy, concentrated force, closeness and vigor of thought and style" is by 1520s. The pith helmet (1889, earlier pith hat, 1884) was so called because it is made from the dried pith of the Bengal spongewood.

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snap (v.)
1520s, of animals, "to make a quick bite," from snap (n.). Meaning "to break suddenly or sharply" is first recorded c. 1600; the mental sense is from 1970s. Meaning "come into place with a snap" is from 1793. Meaning "take a photograph" is from 1890. U.S. football sense first recorded 1887. Related: Snapped; snapping. To snap the fingers is from 1670s. Phrase snap out of it recorded by 1907. Snapping turtle is attested from 1784. Snap-brim (adj.) in reference to a type of hat is from 1928.
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pullover (adj.)

also pull-over, 1871, originally of hats, from the verbal phrase; see pull (v.) + over (adv.). As a noun, from 1875 as a kind of cap of silk or felted fur drawn over a hat-body to form the napping; 1925 as a type of sweater (short for pullover sweater, 1912), so called in reference to the method of putting it on by drawing it over the head. To pull over, in reference to a driver or motor vehicle, "go to the side of the road," is by 1930.

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pileated (adj.)

"having the feathers of the top of the head elongated and conspicuous," 1728, from Latin pileatus "capped," from pileus "conical felt cap without a brim," which is perhaps from Greek pilos "felt; felt hat," also "felt shoe, felt blanket," or they may be from a common source (somewhat similar words are found in Germanic and Slavic). Beekes calls it "an old culture word of unknown origin." Applied in natural history to sea urchins and certain birds, notably the pileated woodpecker, a large species of North America.

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hatch (v.1)
early 13c., hachen, "to produce young from eggs by incubation," probably from an unrecorded Old English *hæccan, of unknown origin, related to Middle High German, German hecken "to mate" (used of birds). Meaning "to come forth from an egg," also "cause to come forth from an egg" are late 14c. Figurative use (of plots, etc.) is from early 14c. Related: Hatched; hatching.
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hater (n.)
"one who hates, an enemy," late 14c., agent noun from hate (v.).
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man-hater (n.)

"misanthrope," 1570s, from man (n.) + hater. Old English had mannhata "man-hater." Often in old use of Timon of Athens. Meaning "a woman who hates the male sex" is by 1839.

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hatha-yoga (n.)
1911, from Sanskrit hatha "force, violence, forced meditation" + yoga (see yoga).
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