Etymology
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kohl (n.)

"powder used to darken the eyelids, etc.," properly of finely ground antimony, 1799, from Arabic kuhl (see alcohol).

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post-hole (n.)

"hole cut in the ground to receive the end of a fence-post," 1703, from post (n.1) + hole (n.).

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punt (n.1)

in football, "a kick of the ball as it is dropped from the hands and before it strikes the ground," 1845; from punt (v.).

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*er- (2)

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "earth, ground." It forms all or part of: aardvark; aardwolf; earth; earthen; earthy.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Old English eorþe "ground, soil, dirt, dry land," Old Norse jörð, Old High German erda, Gothic airþa; Middle Irish -ert "earth."

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pick (n.1)

c. 1200, "pointed iron tool for breaking up rock or ground," apparently a variant of pike (n.4).

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pied a terre (n.)

"small town house or rooms used for short residences," 1829, French, pied à terre, literally "foot on the ground."

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cutworm (n.)

larvae of certain moths, 1768, from cut (v.) + worm (n.). At night they emerge from the ground and cut off at the surface tender plants.

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oatmeal (n.)

"the coarsely ground meal of oats," late 14c., ote-mele, from oat + Middle English mele (see meal (n.2)).

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slope (n.)

1610s, "inclination," from slope (v.). Meaning "an incline, a slant (of ground)" is from 1620s. Derogatory slang meaning "Oriental person" is attested from 1948.

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shipyard (n.)

"plot of ground near the water on which ships are constructed," c. 1700, from ship (n.) + yard (n.1).

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