Etymology
Advertisement
vamoose (v.)

"to decamp, be off," 1834, from Spanish vamos "let us go," from Latin vadamus, first person plural indicative or subjunctive of vadere "to go, to walk, go hastily," from PIE root *wadh- (2) "to go" (source also of Old English wadan "to go," Latin vadum "ford;" see wade (v.)).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
kart (n.)

1957, American English, short for go-kart (see go-cart).

Related entries & more 
baddest (adj.)

obsolete or colloquial superlative of bad (adj.), common 14c.-18c.

Related entries & more 
caco- 

before vowels cac-, word-forming element meaning "bad, ill, poor" (as in cacography, the opposite of calligraphy and orthography), from Latinized form of Greek kakos "bad, evil," considered by etymologists probably to be connected with PIE root *kakka- "to defecate." The ancient Greek word was common in compounds; when added to words already bad, it made them worse; when added to words signifying something good, it often implies too little of it.

Related entries & more 
ambient (adj.)

1590s, "surrounding, encircling," from Latin ambientem (nominative ambiens) "a going around," present participle of ambire "to go around, go about," from amb- "around" (from PIE root *ambhi- "around") + ire "go" (from PIE root *ei- "to go"). The notion of "going all around" led to the sense of "encircling, lying all around."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
kakistocracy (n.)

"government by the worst element of a society," 1829, coined (by Thomas Love Peacock) on analogy of its opposite, aristocracy, from Greek kakistos "worst," superlative of kakos "bad" (which perhaps is related to PIE root *kakka- "to defecate") + -cracy. Perhaps the closest word in ancient Greek was kakonomia "a bad system of laws and government," hence kakonomos "with bad laws, ill-governed."

Related entries & more 
precede (v.)

early 15c., preceden, "lead the way; occur or exist before, go before in order of time," from Old French preceder and directly from Latin praecedere "to go before," from prae "before" (see pre-) + cedere "to go" (from PIE root *ked- "to go, yield"). Meaning "to walk in front of" is late 15c.; that of "to go before in rank or importance" is attested from mid-15c. Related: Preceded; preceding.

Related entries & more 
malnourished (adj.)

"suffering from insufficient nutrition," 1906, from mal- "bad, badly" + nourished (see nourish).

Related entries & more 
misinterpretation (n.)

"a wrong understanding or explanation," 1570s, from mis- (1) "bad, wrong" + interpretation.

Related entries & more 
unfortune (n.)

"misfortune, bad luck," early 15c., from un- (1) "not" + fortune (n.).

Related entries & more 

Page 6