Etymology
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co-defendant (n.)

also codefendant, "one who is a defendant along with another," 1640s, from co- + defendant.

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longshoreman (n.)
"stevedore, one whose work is loading and unloading ships," 1811, from shortening of alongshore "existing or employed along a shore or coast" + man (n.).
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ambient (adj.)
1590s, "surrounding, encircling," from Latin ambientem (nominative ambiens) "a going around," present participle of ambire "to go around, go about," from amb- "around" (from PIE root *ambhi- "around") + ire "go" (from PIE root *ei- "to go"). The notion of "going all around" led to the sense of "encircling, lying all around."
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alongside (adv.)
1707, "parallel to the side of," contraction of the prepositional phrase; see along + side (n.). Originally mostly nautical. As a preposition from 1793.
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thalweg (n.)
1831, from German Thalweg "path along the bottom of a valley," from thal (see dale) + weg "road, path" (see way (n.)).
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roadhouse (n.)
"inn by a roadside," 1857, later "place for refreshment and entertainment along a road" (1922), from road (n.) + house (n.).
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precede (v.)

early 15c., preceden, "lead the way; occur or exist before, go before in order of time," from Old French preceder and directly from Latin praecedere "to go before," from prae "before" (see pre-) + cedere "to go" (from PIE root *ked- "to go, yield"). Meaning "to walk in front of" is late 15c.; that of "to go before in rank or importance" is attested from mid-15c. Related: Preceded; preceding.

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coaster (n.)

1570s, "one who sails along coasts," especially one who trades from port to port in the same country, agent noun from coast (v.) in its sense "to go around the sides or border" of something. Applied to vessels for such sailing from 1680s.

The meaning "tabletop drink mat" to protect a wooden table surface from condensation, etc., was in use by 1913, extended from bottle-coaster "low, round tray used for a decanter" (1874); it was formerly on wheels and so called probably because it "coasted" around the perimeter of the table to each guest in turn after dinner.

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ambit (n.)
late 14c., "space surrounding a building or town; precinct;" 1590s, "a circuit;" from Latin ambitus "a going round, a circuit, circumference," noun use of past participle of ambire "to go around, go about," from amb- "around" (from PIE root *ambhi- "around") + ire "go" (from PIE root *ei- "to go").
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katabatic (adj.)
of winds, "blowing down a slope," 1904, from Greek katabatos "descending," from katabainein "to go down," a compound of kata "down" (see cata-) + bainein "to go, walk, step," from PIE root *gwa- "to go, come."
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