Etymology
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diamante (adj.)

"powdered glass or crystal," by 1904, from French diamanté, past participle of diamanter "to set with diamonds," from Old French diamant (see diamond). Diamante also was a Middle English form of diamond.

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spritz (v.)

1917, from Yiddish or directly from German spritzen "to squirt," from Middle High German sprützen "to squirt, sprout," from Proto-Germanic *sprut- (see sprout (v.)). Spritzer "glass of wine mixed with carbonated water" is from 1961.

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stopper (n.)

late 15c., "one who obstructs," agent noun from stop (v.). From 1590s as "something that obstructs;" specific sense "glass plug for a bottle neck" is from 1660s. As a verb from 1670s. Related: Stoppered.

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Jabberwocky 

1871, nonsense word (perhaps based on jabber) coined by Lewis Carroll, for the poem of the same name, which he published in "Through the Looking-Glass." The poem is about a fabulous beast called the Jabberwock.

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punty (n.)

"iron rod used in manipulating hot glass," 1660s, ponte, from French pontil, a diminutive form from Latin punctum "a point" (from nasalized form of PIE root *peuk- "to prick"). Also ponty, and sometimes in English in the French form.

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hothouse (n.)

mid-15c., "bath house," from hot + house (n.). In 17c. a euphemism for "brothel;" the meaning "glass-roofed structure for raising tender plants or protecting exotics" is from 1749. Figurative use of this sense by 1802.

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mooreeffoc (n.)

"coffee-room, viewed from the inside through a glass door, as it was seen by Dickens on a dark London day; ... used by Chesterton to denote the queerness of things that have become trite, when they are seen suddenly from a new angle." [J.R.R. Tolkien, "On Fairy Stories"]

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sunglasses (n.)

glasses with darkened lenses to protect one's eyes while observing the sun, also sun-glasses, 1878, from sun (n.) + glasses. In popular (non-astronomy) use from 1916. Earlier sunglass (1804) meant a burning glass.

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speculum (n.)

1590s, in surgery and medicine, "instrument for rendering a part accessible to observation," from Latin speculum "reflector, looking-glass, mirror" (also "a copy, an imitation"), from specere "to look at, view" (from PIE root *spek- "to observe"). As a type of telescope attachment from 1704.

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looking (n.)

late 12c., "the action of looking," verbal noun from look (v.). From late 13c. as "look in the eyes, facial expression;" also "personal appearance, aspect." Looking-glass is from 1520s. The noun looking-in (1926) was an old expression for "television viewing."

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