Etymology
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naturist (n.)

"participant in the movement for communal nudity," 1929, from nature + -ist. Earlier in other senses, including "naturalist" and "a physician who trusts entirely to nature for a cure" (1851). Related: Naturistic; naturism.

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Pietism (n.)

1690s, in reference to a specific religious movement, Pietism, from German Pietismus, originally applied in derision to the movement to revive personal piety in the Lutheran Church, begun in Frankfurt c. 1670 by Philipp Jakob Spener (1635-1705). See piety + -ism. With lower-case p- and in reference generally to devotion, godliness of life (as distinguished from mere intellectual orthodoxy), by 1829.

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earthquake (n.)

"movement or vibration of a part of the earth's crust," late 13c., eorthequakynge, from earth + quake (n.). In this sense Old English had eorðdyn, eorðhrernes, eorðbeofung, eorðstyrung.

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swinging (adj.)
1550s, "moving to and fro," present-participle adjective from swing (v.). Meaning "marked by a free, sweeping movement" is from 1818. Sense of "uninhibited" is from 1958.
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eurythmic (adj.)

also eurhythmic, "harmonious," 1831, from Greek eurythmia "rhythmical order," from eurythmos "rhythmical, well-proportioned," from eu "well, good" (see eu-) + rhythmos "measured flow or movement, rhythm; proportion, symmetry" (see rhythm). Related: Eurythmics (also eurhythmics), "system of rhythmical body movement to music, used as therapy or to teach musical understanding," developed by Swiss music educator Émile Jaques-Dalcroze; eurythmy.

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Viet Minh (n.)
also Vietminh, 1945, name of the independence movement in French Indo-China 1941-50, in full Viêt Nam Dôc-Lâp Dông-Minh "Vietnamese Independence League."
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motility (n.)

"capacity of automatic or spontaneous movement," 1827, from French motilité (1827), from Latin mot-, stem of movere "to move" (from PIE root *meue- "to push away").

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kinesics (n.)

study of body language, 1952, from Greek kinēsis "movement, motion," from kinein "to move" (from PIE root *keie- "to set in motion") + -ics. Related: kinesic.

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New Age (adj.)
1971, in reference to a modern spiritual movement, from new + age (n.). It had been used at various times at least since the 1840s.
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impressionism (n.)
1839 as a term in philosophy, from impression + -ism. With reference to the French art movement, 1879, from impressionist. Extended 1880s to music (Debussy), literature, etc.
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