Etymology
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footage (n.)

"the length of film used in a scene, etc.," 1916, from foot (n.) as a measure of length + -age. Earlier the word was used to describe a piece-work system to pay miners.

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dolce vita (n.)

"life of pleasure," 1961, Italian, from the title of Fellini's 1960 film. The Italian elements are from Latin dulcis "sweet" (see dulcet) +  Latin vita "life," from PIE root *gwei- "to live."

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splice (n.)
1620s (implied in splicing), first recorded in writing of Capt. John Smith, from splice (v.). Motion picture film sense is from 1923. In colloquial use, "marriage union, wedding" (1830).
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Tony 
masc. proper name, short for Anthony. Tony Curtis, style of men's haircut (usually with a D.A. at the back), is from 1956, from screen name of U.S. film star Bernard Schwarz (1925-2010).
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oater (n.)

"Western film" (featuring horse-riding cowboys and Indians), 1946, American English, from oat, as the typical food of horses. Oats opera (on the model of soap opera) is by 1937 in U.S. slang.

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masala 

spice blends, particularly in Indian cookery. In English by 1833 (as musala.) Masala film, an Indian movie with multiple genre elements, named for the spice blend, by 1990.

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art (adj.)
"produced with conscious artistry" (as opposed to popular or folk), 1890, from art (n.), possibly from influence of German kunstlied "art song." Art film is from 1960; art rock from 1968.
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Shangri-La (n.)

imaginary earthly paradise, by 1938, from Shangri-La, name of Tibetan utopia in James Hilton's novel "Lost Horizon" (1933, film version 1937). In Tibetan, la means "mountain pass."

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Cinerama (n.)

proprietary name for a form of cinema film projected on a wide, curved screen, 1951, from cinema + -rama. Purists point out that the proper formation would be *Cinorama.

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dark-room (n.)

also darkroom, in photography, "room from which any light that would affect a photographic plate or film has been excluded," 1841, from dark (adj.) + room (n.).

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