Etymology
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Mylar (n.)
proper name for a polyester film, 1954, trademarked by E.I. Du Pont de Nemours and Co., Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A. Like many Du Pont names, it doesn't mean anything, they just liked the sound.
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preview (v.)

c. 1600, "to see beforehand," from pre- "before" + view (v.). Marked "rare" in Century Dictionary (1895). The meaning "to show (a film, etc.) before its public opening" is from 1928. Related: Previewed; previewing.

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serial (n.)

1845, "a tale published in successive numbers of a periodical," from serial (adj.). Short for serial novel, etc. By 1914 as "a film shown in episodes," later extended to radio programs, etc.

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rewind (v.)

also re-wind, "wind again, wind back," 1717, from re- "back, again" + wind (v.1). The noun meaning "mechanism for rewinding film or tape" is recorded from 1938; the sense of "act or process of winding backwards" is by 1964. Related: Rewound; rewinding.

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bodacious (adj.)
1837 (implied in bodaciously), Southern U.S. slang, perhaps from bodyaciously "bodily, totally," or a blend of bold and audacious, which suits the earliest attested sense of the word. Popularized anew by the 1982 Hollywood film "An Officer and a Gentleman."
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palimony (n.)

"compensation claimed by the deserted party at the separation of an unmarried couple cohabiting," 1979, coined from pal (n.) + alimony. Popularized, if not introduced, during lawsuit against U.S. film star Lee Marvin (1924-1987).

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mondo (adj.)

"very much, extreme," 1979, from Italian mondo "world" (from Latin mundus; see mundane); specifically from "Mondo cane," title of a 1961 film, literally "world for a dog" (English title "A Dog's Life"), depicting eccentric human behavior. The word was abstracted from the title and taken as an intensifier.

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Guido 
masc. proper name, Italian, literally "leader," of Germanic origin (see guide (v.)). As a type of gaudy machoism often associated with Italian-Americans, 1980s, teen slang, from the name of character in Hollywood film "Risky Business" (1983).
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indie (n.)
"independent record company," 1945, shortening of independent. Among the earliest mentioned were Continental, Majestic, and Signature. Used of film production companies since 1920s, of theaters from 1942; extended by 1984 to a type of pop music issued by such labels.
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snuff (v.1)
"to cut or pinch off the burned part of a candle wick," mid-15c., from noun snoffe "burned part of a candle wick" (late 14c.), of unknown origin, perhaps related to snuff (v.2). The meaning "to die" is from 1865; that of "to kill" is from 1932; snuff-film, originally an urban legend, is from 1975.
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