Etymology
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saturate (v.)

1530s, "to satisfy, satiate, fill full" (senses now obsolete), from Latin saturatus, past participle of saturare "to fill full, sate, drench," from satur "sated, full" (from PIE root *sa- "to satisfy").

In chemistry, the meaning "to impregnate or unite with until no more can be received" is from 1680s; the general sense of "soak thoroughly, imbue (with)" is by 1756. The commercial sense of "oversupply" (a market, with a product) is by 1958. As a noun, "a saturated fat," by 1959. Related: Saturated; saturating.

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interspace (n.)
"space between" (any two things), early 15c., from Late Latin interspatium, from inter "between" (see inter-) + spatium (see space (n.)). As a verb, "fill or occupy the space between," 1832. Related: Interspaced; interspacing.
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polyhistor (n.)

"very learned person, one versed in many areas of study," 1580s, from Latin polyhistor (the title of a grammarian), from Greek polyhistōr "very learned," from polys "much, many" (from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill") + histōr "knowing, learned, expert" (see history).

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shim (n.)
1723, a Kentish word of unknown origin. Originally a piece of iron fitted to a plow for scraping soil; meaning "thin slip of wood to fill up a space or raise a level" is from 1860.
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polydipsia (n.)

in pathology, "excessive thirst," 1650s, from Greek polydipsios "very thirsty," from polys "much, many" (from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill") + dipsa "thirst" (a word of unknown origin) + -ia "condition of."

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engorge (v.)
1510s, "fill to excess," from French engorger "to obstruct, block, congest," Old French engorgier "to swallow, devour," from en- (see en- (1)) + gorge "throat" (see gorge (n.)). Probably originally in reference to hawks. Related: Engorged; engorging.
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plenitude (n.)

early 15c., "fullness, completeness, perfection," from Old French plenitude and directly from Latin plenitudinem (nominative plenitudo) "abundance, completeness, fullness," from plenus "full, filled, greatly crowded; stout, pregnant; abundant, abounding; complete," from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill." Related: Plenitudinary.

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Terpsichore (n.)

the muse of the dance, Greek Terpsikhore, literally "enjoyment of dance," from terpein "to delight" (from PIE root *terp- "to satisfy;" source also of Sanskrit trpyati "takes one's fill," Lithuanian tarpstu, tarpti "to thrive, prosper") + khoros "dance, chorus" (see chorus).

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impassion (v.)
1590s, "inflame with passion," from Italian impassionare "to fill with passion," from assimilated form of in- "in, into" (from PIE root *en "in") + passione "passion," from Latin passionem (see passion). Related: Impassioned; impassionable. Formerly also empassion.
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tamp (v.)
1819, "to fill (a hole containing an explosive) with dirt or clay before blasting," a workmen's word, perhaps a back-formation from tampion, that word being mistaken as a present participle (*tamping).
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