Etymology
Advertisement
sudarium (n.)
"napkin for wiping the face," especially the cloth of St. Veronica, on which an image of Christ's face was believed to be imprinted, c. 1600, from Latin sudare "to sweat," from sudor "sweat" (see sweat (n.)). Earlier in nativized form sudary (mid-14c.).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
grimace (v.)
1707, from French grimacer, from grimace "grotesque face" (see grimace (n.)). Related: Grimaced; grimacing.
Related entries & more 
coco (n.)

"palm tree," 1550s, from Spanish and Portuguese coco "grinning or grimacing face," on resemblance of the three depressions at the base of the shell to a monkey or human face. The earlier word for it was the Latinized form cocus, which sometimes was Englished as cocos.

Related entries & more 
brazen (adj.)
Old English bræsen "of brass," from bræs "brass" (see brass (n.)) + -en (2). The figurative sense of "hardened in effrontery" is from 1570s (in brazen-faced), perhaps suggesting a face unable to show shame. To brazen it "face impudently" is from 1550s. Related: Brazenly.
Related entries & more 
mug (v.1)

"to beat up," 1818, originally "to strike the face" (in pugilism), from mug (n.2) "face." The general meaning "attack" is attested by 1846, and "attack to rob" by 1864. Perhaps influenced by thieves' slang mug "dupe, fool, sucker" (1851). Related: Mugged; mugging.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
chops (n.)
"jaws, sides of the face," c. 1500, perhaps a variant of chaps (n.2) in the same sense, which is of unknown origin.
Related entries & more 
archivolt (n.)
ornamental molding on the face of an arch, 1731, from Italian archivolto, from volta, volto "arch, vault" (see vault (n.1)).
Related entries & more 
smiley (adj.)
also smily, "inclined to smile," 1848, from smile (n.) + -y (2). Smiley-face (n.) is from 1981; as a computer icon from 1987.
Related entries & more 
brave (v.)
"to face with bravery," 1761, from French braver, from brave "valiant" (see brave (adj.)). Related: Braved; braving.
Related entries & more 
compact (n.2)

"small make-up case," 1919, from compact (adj.), based on its containing compacted face powder.

Related entries & more 

Page 6