Etymology
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hippomania (n.)

"excessive fondness for horses" (especially in reference to the intense and passionate interest in horses developed in some girls between ages 10 and 14), 1956, from hippo- "horse" + mania.

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Gallomania (n.)

"excessive or undue enthusiasm for France and all things French," 1797, from combining form of Gaul + mania. Jefferson used adjective Gallomane (1787). Compare Anglomania, which might have served as the model for this word.

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sectarianism (n.)

1670s, "disposition to petty sects in opposition to things established" [Johnson], "state or character of being sectarian, excessive attachment to a particular sect;" see sectarian + -ism. An older word was sectarism (1640s), from sectary.

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dipsomania (n.)

1843, "morbid craving for alcohol," also used of the temporary madness caused by excessive drinking, coined in medical Latin from Greek dipsa "thirst" (which is of unknown origin) + mania. It is recorded earlier in Italian (1829) and German (1830) medical works.

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Barnum 

surname taken as the type of excessive hype and promotion, by 1850s, from circus owner P.T. Barnum (1810-1891), described in OED as "a pushing American show-proprietor." The surname is from the place-name Barnham.

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undue (adj.)

late 14c., "not owing or payable; unjustly demanded," also "not appropriate, unseasonable," also "excessive," from un- (1) "not" + past participle of due (v.). Formed on model of Old French indeu, Latin indebitus.

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drunkard (n.)

"person who is frequently inebriated, one given to excessive use of strong drink," 1520s, droncarde, but probably older (attested from late 13c. as a surname, Mauricius Druncard), from Middle English dronken, participial adjective from drink, + -ard.

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satyriasis (n.)

"excessive and unrestrainable venereal desire in the male," 1650s, medical Latin, from Greek satyriasis, from satyros (see satyr). Also in the same sense was satyromania (1889 as a dictionary word; 1759 in Modern Latin), and compare priapism.

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asceticism (n.)

1640s, from ascetic (adj.) + -ism. Sometimes also ascetism (1830).

Asceticism goes beyond austerity, being more manifestly excessive and more clearly delighting in self-mortification as a good in itself ; it also generally includes somewhat of the disposition to retire from the world. [Century Dictionary]
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nimiety (n.)

"excess, redundancy, state of being too much," 1560s, from Latin nimietas "excessiveness," from nimius "beyond measure, excessive," from nimis (adv.) "too much, beyond measure, excessively," from *ne-mis- "not little," from PIE root *ne- "not" + *mi- "little," from PIE root *mei- (2) "small."

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