Etymology
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uniform (v.)

1680s, "to make alike," from uniform (adj.). Meaning "to dress in a uniform" is from 1861. Related: Uniformed.

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finery (n.)

1670s, "showy dress," from fine (adj.) + -ery. Literally, "something that is fine."

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barber (v.)

"to shave and dress the hair," c.1600, from barber (n.). Related: Barbered; barbering.

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stove-pipe (n.)

1690s, from stove (n.) + pipe (n.). As a type of hat for men, from 1851, so called for being tall and cylindrical like a stove-pipe.

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bandage (v.)

"to dress a wound, etc., with a bandage," 1734 (implied in bandaging), from bandage (n.). Related: Bandaged.

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Wellington (n.)

boot so called from 1817, for Arthur, 1st Duke of Wellington (1769-1852), who also in his lifetime had a style of coat, hat, and trousers named for him as well as a variety of apple and pine tree.

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fedora (n.)

type of hat, 1887, American English, from "Fédora," a popular play by Victorien Sardou (1831-1908) that opened 1882, in which the heroine, a Russian princess named Fédora Romanoff, originally was performed by Sarah Bernhardt. During the play, Bernhardt, a notorious cross-dresser, wore a center-creased, soft brimmed hat. Women's-rights activists adopted the fashion. The proper name is Russian fem. of Fedor, from Greek Theodoros, literally "gift of god," from theos "god" (from PIE root *dhes-, forming words for religious concepts) + dōron "gift" (from PIE root *do- "to give").

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blockhead (n.)

also block-head, "stupid person," 1540s (implied in blockheaded), from block (n.1) + head (n.); probably originally an image of the head-shaped oaken block used by hat-makers, though the insulting sense is equally old.

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underdressed (adj.)

also under-dressed, "too plainly dressed," 1759, from under (adv.) + past participle of dress (v.).

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pillbox (n.)

also pill-box, "box for holding pills," 1730, from pill (n.) + box (n.). As a small round concrete machine gun nest, it came into use in World War I. As a type of hat, attested from 1958.

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