Etymology
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puddle (n.)

early 14c., "small pool of dirty water," frequentative or diminutive of Old English pudd "ditch," related to German pudeln "to splash in water" (compare poodle). Originally used of pools and ponds as well. Puddle-duck for the common domestic duck is by 1846.

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Krishna 

eighth avatar of Vishnu, 1793, from Sanskrit krshnah, literally "the Black One," from PIE *kers-no-, suffixed form of root *kers- "dark, dirty" (source also of Old Church Slavonic crunu, Russian coron, Serbo-Croatian crn, Czech cerny, Old Prussian kirsnan "black," Lithuanian keršas "black and white, variegated").

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kludge 

a fanciful, humorous coinage by U.S. author Jackson W. Granholm (1921-2007), "ill-assorted collection of poorly-matching parts, forming a distressing whole" (Granholm's definition), 1962, also as a verb. It persisted in the jargon of computer programmers for quick-and-dirty fixes in code. Related: Kludged; kludgy.

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soil (n.2)

"filth, dirt, refuse matter, sewage, liquid likely to contain excrement," c. 1600, earlier "miry or muddy place" (early 15c.), from Old French soille "miry place," from soillier (v.) "to make dirty," and in part a native formation from soil (v.). This is the sense in archaic night-soil.

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smutty (adj.)

1590s, of plants, grain, etc., "affected with mildew;" in general, "dirty, blackened," 1640s; from 1660s as "indecent, obscene;" from smut + -y (2). Smutchy "marked by or as if by smutch" is from 1570s. Related: Smuttily; smuttiness. Smutty-nosed in ornithology means "having black nostrils."

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Okie 

"migrant agricultural worker," especially (but not exclusively) one driven from farms in Oklahoma during the Dust Bowl, 1938, short for U.S. state of Oklahoma.

"Okie use' ta mean you was from Oklahoma. Now it means you're a dirty son-of-a-bitch." [John Steinbeck, "The Grapes of Wrath," 1939]
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pig (v.)

mid-15c., piggen, of sows, "to farrow, to bring forth piglets," from pig (n.1). By 1670s as "to huddle together in a dirty or disorderly manner, as pigs do, hence, generally, "to act or live like a pig" in any sense. Related: Pigged; pigging. Colloquial pig out "eat voraciously" is attested by 1979.

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smatter (v.)

early 15c., smateren, intransitive, "talk idly, chatter; talk ignorantly or superficially," a word of uncertain origin, perhaps imitative. Similar words are found in Middle High German smetern "to chatter" and Swedish smattra "to patter, rattle," and compare Danish snaddre "chatter, jabber," Dutch snateren, German schnattern "cackle, chatter, prattle."

Or it might be a special sense of Middle English smateren "to make dirty, defile" (late 14c.). Middle English Compendium compares bismotered "bespattered," smotten "corrupt, debase, defile."

The older sense is obsolete. The meaning "have slight or superficial knowledge of, be a smatterer," is by 1520s. Related: Smattered; smattering.

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sutler (n.)

formerly also suttler, "person who follows an army to sell food, liquor, etc. to soldiers," 1580s, from Middle Dutch soeteler "small tradesman, peddler, victualer, camp cook" (Dutch zoetelaar), cognate with Middle Low German suteler, sudeler "person who performs dirty tasks," Middle High German sudelen "to cook badly," Middle Dutch soetelen "to cook badly." Probably also related to Dutch zieder, German sieden "to seethe," from Proto-Germanic *suth-, from PIE root *seut- "to seethe, boil" (see seethe).

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slubberdegullion (n.)

"a slobbering or dirty fellow, a worthless sloven," 1610s, from slubber "to daub, smear; behave carelessly or negligently" (1520s), probably from Dutch or Low German (compare slobber (v.)). Second element appears to be an attempt to imitate French; or perhaps it is French, related to Old French goalon "a sloven." Century Dictionary speculates the -de- means "insignificant" or else is from hobbledehoy, and for the final element suggests cullion "a base fellow" (for which see cull (n.2)). For the formation, also compare gobbledygook.

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