Etymology
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denature (v.)

"alter (something) so as to change its nature," 1878, from French dénaturer (Old French desnaturer "change the nature of; make unnatural"); see de- + nature. Earlier it meant "to make unnatural" (1680s). Earlier in the modern sense of denature was denaturalize (1812). Related: Denatured.

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Denmark 

Scandinavian country from Dane, the people's name, + Danish mark "border" (see mark (n.1)). The modern form is attested from late 14c. (from earlier Denemarke, c. 1200, from Old English Dene-mearce), but originally it meant western Scandinavia generally, "the lands of the Danes and Northmen." As an adjective, Middle English had Dene-marchish.

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Dennis 
masc. proper name, from French Denis, ultimately from Latin Dionysius, name of an important 6c. Church father, from Greek Dionysos, god of wine and revelry.
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denominational (adj.)

"pertaining to a religious denomination or sect," 1838; see denomination + -al (1). Related: Denominationalism "tendency to divide into sects or denominations, inclination to emphasize distinguishing characteristics as opposed to general principles" (1845).

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dentifrice (n.)

early 15c., dentifricie, "substance used in cleaning the teeth," from Latin dentifricium "powder for rubbing the teeth," from dens (genitive dentis) "tooth" (from PIE root *dent- "tooth") + fricare "to rub" (see friction).

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non-denominational (adj.)

also nondenominational, "of no denomination," 1893, from non- + denominational.

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denigration (n.)

early 15c., denigracioun, "act of making or becoming black, darkening, discoloration," from Late Latin denigrationem (nominative denigratio), noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin denigrare "to blacken; to defame," from de-"completely" (see de-) + nigr-, stem of niger "black," which is of unknown origin. Figurative sense "blackening of character or reputation" is by 1868.

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dendrochronology (n.)

"dating by tree rings," 1928; see dendro- "tree" + chronology. As a native alternative, tree-time was proposed.

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dengue (n.)

"febrile epidemic disease of the tropics," 1828, from West Indian Spanish dengue, from an African source, perhaps Swahili dinga "seizure, cramp," with form influenced by Spanish dengue "prudery" (perhaps because sufferers walk stiffly and erect due to the painful joints which characterize the disease). The disease is from East Africa and was introduced into the West Indies in 1827.

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dense (adj.)

early 15c., "closely compacted, thick," from Latin densus "thick, crowded; cloudy," which is of uncertain etymology, perhaps related to Greek dasys "hairy, shaggy; thick with leaves," as a grammatical term, "aspirated," but even this is in doubt. Figurative sense of "difficult to penetrate" (of writing, etc.) is from 1732; that of "stupid" is first recorded 1822. Related: Densely; denseness.

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