Etymology
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pre-exilic (adj.)

"existing or done before exile," 1884, chiefly in reference to Biblical writings supposed to date before the Jewish exile (586-537 B.C.E.), from pre- "before" + exile (n.) + -ic.

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bell (v.)
"attach a bell to," late 14c., from bell (n.). Related: Belled; belling. Allusions to the story of the mice that undertook to bell the cat (so they can hear him coming) date to late 14c.
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abreast (adv.)
mid-15c., a contraction of on brest "side-by-side," from a- (1) + breast (n.); the notion is of "with breasts in line." To keep abreast in figurative sense of "stay up-to-date" is from 1650s.
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hepcat (n.)

also hep-cat, "addict of swing music," more generally, "one who is in the know and knows it," 1937, from hep (1) "aware, up-to-date" in jazz slang + cat (n.) in the slang sense "jazz enthusiast."

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hep (1)

"aware, up-to-date," first recorded 1908 in "Saturday Evening Post," but said to be underworld slang, of unknown origin. Variously said to have been the name of "a fabulous detective who operated in Cincinnati" [Louis E. Jackson and C.R. Hellyer, "A Vocabulary of Criminal Slang," 1914] or a saloonkeeper in Chicago who "never quite understood what was going on ... (but) thought he did" [American Speech, XVI, 154/1]. Taken up by jazz musicians by 1915. With the rise of hip (adj.) by the 1950s, the use of hep ironically became a clue that the speaker was unaware and not up-to-date.

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circa (adv.)

"about, at or near (a given date)" when the exact time is unknown, 1856, from Latin circa (adv., prep.) "around, round about, near; in the region of; about the time of," alternative form of circum "round about" (see circum-).

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tamarisk (n.)
southern European evergreen shrub, c. 1400, from Late Latin tamariscus, variant of tamarix, of unknown origin, probably a borrowing from a non-Indo-European language; perhaps Semitic and related to Hebrew tamar "palm tree, date palm" (see tamarind).
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parachronism (n.)

"error in chronology by which an event has assigned to it a date later than the proper one," 1640s, from para- "beside, beyond" + Latinized form of Greek khronos "time" (see chrono-) + -ism

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Jody (n.)
"civilian who is thought to be prospering back home with a soldier's sweetheart, wife, job, etc.," by 1979, said to date from World War II, from masc. proper name Jody, for no clear reason. Hence Jody call.
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hippie (n.)
c. 1965, American English (Haight-Ashbury slang); earlier (1953) a variant (usually disparaging) of hipster (1941) "person keenly aware of the new and stylish," from hip "up-to-date" (see hip (adj.)). Related: Hippiedom.
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