Etymology
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question (v.)

late 15c., questiounen, "to inquire, ask, seek to know," from question (n.) and from Old French questioner "ask questions, interrogate, torture" (13c.), from question (n.). Hence "to dispute, doubt," by 1530s. Transitive sense of "inquire of by asking questions" is from late 15c. Related: Questioned; questioning. Alternative verb questionize is attested from 1847.

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crantara (n.)

"The fiery cross which in old times formed the rallying symbol in the Highlands of Scotland in any sudden emergency," Gaelic cranntara, cranntaraidh, also (by influence of crois "cross") croistara, croistaraidh, literally "the beam or cross of reproach," from crann "a beam, a shaft" (see crane (n.)) + tair "reproach, disgrace." "[S]o called because neglect of the symbol implied infamy" [Century Dictionary].

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crossway (n.)

also cross-way, c. 1300, "a crossroad," from cross- + way (n.). Crossways (adv.) "crosswise, transversely," with adverbial genitive -s, is from c. 1300.

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crossbow (n.)

also cross-bow, "missile-throwing weapon consisting of a bow fixed athwart a stock," mid-15c., from cross (n.) + bow (n.1). Unknown to the ancients but common in Europe in the Middle Ages.

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x (v.)
"cross out with an 'X'," 1942, from X.
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crucial (adj.)

1706, "cross-shaped, having the form of an X," from French crucial, a medical term for ligaments of the interior of the knee-joint (which cross each other), from Latin crux (genitive crucis) "cross" (see crux).

The meaning "decisive, critical, finally disproving one of two alternative suppositions" (1830) is extended from a logical term, Instantias Crucis, adopted by Francis Bacon (1620); the notion is of cross fingerboard signposts at forking roads, thus a requirement to choose.

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cruciate (adj.)

"cross-shaped, having the form of a cross with equal arms," 1826, from Modern Latin cruciatus, from Latin crux (genitive crucis) "cross" (see crux (n.)). Obsolete meaning "tormented" is 1530s, from Latin cruciat-, past participle stem of cruciare "cause pain or anguish to," literally "crucify," from crux. Related: Cruciately; cruciation.

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crisscross (n.)

also criss-cross, 1833, "a checked pattern in cloth," 1848, "a crossing or intersection," from Middle English crist(s)-crosse (early 15c.), earlier Cristes-cros (c. 1200) "the Cross of Christ," also "the sign of the cross," from late 14c. often "referring to the mark of a cross formerly written before the alphabet in hornbooks. The mark itself stood for the phrase Christ-cross me speed ('May Christ's cross give me success'), a formula said before reciting the alphabet" [Barnhart]. It has long been used without awareness of its origin.

How long agoo lerned ye, 'Crist crosse me spede!'
Have ye no more lernyd of youre a b c,
[Lydgate, "The Prohemy of a Marriage Betwix an Olde Man and a Yonge Wife," c. 1475]

It is attested from 1860 as an old name for tic-tac-toe. As an adjective, by 1846. As a verb, by 1818. 

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saltire (n.)

also saltier, c. 1400, sautour, an ordinary that resembles a St. Andrew's Cross on a shield or flag, consisting of a bend dexter and a bend sinister crossing each other, from Old French sautoir, sautour, literally "stirrup," and directly from Medieval Latin saltarium, noun use of neuter of Latin saltatorius "pertaining to leaping," from salire "to leap" (see salient (adj.)). The connection between stirrups and the diagonal cross is said to be the two deltoid shapes that comprise the cross.

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crossness (n.)

"disposition to be peevish," 1590s, from cross (adj.) + -ness.

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