Etymology
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unprecedented (adj.)

1620s, from un- (1) "not" + precedented. In common use from c. 1760.

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tuppence (n.)

mid-15c., to-pens, representing the common pronunciation of twopence (see two + pence).

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dobbin (n.)

common name of a work-horse or farm horse, 1596 (in "Merchant of Venice"), probably from diminutive form of Dob (early 13c.), the common Middle English familiar form of the masc. proper name Robin or Robert; the personal name being applied to a horse.

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democratize (v.)

1798 (transitive) "make popular or common, bring to a common level, render democratic;" 1840 (intransitive) "become democratic," from French démocratiser, noted as one of the neologisms of the Revolution, from démocratie (see democracy). Greek demokratizein meant "to be on the democratic side."

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homogenous (adj.)

a spelling of homogeneous that represents a common pronunciation, perhaps by influence of homogenize.

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burdock (n.)

common name of a kind of coarse, weedy plant, 1590s, from bur + dock (n.3).

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guerilla (n.)

common misspelling (now perhaps established as a variant) of guerrilla (q.v.); compare French guérilla.

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sea-salt (n.)

"common salt obtained by evaporation of sea water," c. 1600, from sea + salt (n.).

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appellative (adj.)

early 15c., of a noun, "serving to name or mark out, common (as opposed to proper)," from Latin appellativus, from appellat-, past-participle stem of appellare "address, name, appeal to" (see appeal (v.)). As a noun, attested from 1590s, "common name;" 1630s as "title, descriptive name."

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gregarious (adj.)

1660s, "disposed to live in flocks" (of animals), from Latin gregarius "pertaining to a flock; of the herd, of the common sort, common," from grex (genitive gregis) "flock, herd," from PIE *gre-g-, reduplicated form of root *ger- "to gather." Of persons, "sociable," first recorded 1789. Related: Gregariously; gregariousness.

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