Etymology
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comparison (n.)

mid-14c., "equal, match, resemblance, similarity," from Old French comparaison "comparison" (12c.), from Latin comparationem (nominative comparatio), noun of action from past participle stem of comparare "make equal with, liken, bring together for a contest," from com "with, together" (see com-) + par "equal" (see par (n.)).

From late 14c. as "act of putting two things together and regarding them as equal," also "act of comparing."

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con- 

word-forming element meaning "together, with," sometimes merely intensive; it is the form of com- used in Latin before consonants except -b-, -p-, -l-, -m-, or -r-. In native English formations (such as costar), co- tends to be used where Latin would use con-.

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cognomen (n.)

1754, "a distinguishing name;" 1809, "a surname;" from Latin, from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see com-) + (g)nomen "name" (from PIE root *no-men- "name"). The last of the three names by which a Roman citizen was known (Caius Julius Csar, Marcus Tullius Cicero).

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colloquium (n.)

c. 1600, "conversation, dialogue" (a sense now obsolete), from Latin colloquium "conference, conversation," literally "a speaking together," from com- "together" (see com-) + -loquium "speaking," from loqui "to speak" (from PIE root *tolkw- "to speak"). Also as a legal term; meaning "a meeting for discussion, assembly, conference, seminar" is attested by 1844.

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compile (v.)

"to collect and present information from authentic sources, to make or form by putting together in some order written or printed material from various sources," early 14c., from Old French compiler "compile, collect" (13c.) and directly from a Medieval Latin special use of Latin compilare "to plunder, rob," probably originally "bundle together, heap up;" hence "to pack up and carry off," from com "with, together" (see com-) + pilare "to compress, ram down." Related: Compiled; compiling.

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collocate (v.)

"to set or place together," 1510s, from Latin collocatus, past participle of collocare "to arrange, place together, set in a place," from assimilated form of com "together" (see com-) + locare "to place," from locus "a place" (see locus). Related: collocated; collocating.

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coetaneous (adj.)

"having the same age as another, beginning to exist at the same time," c. 1600, from Late Latin coaetanus "one of the same age," from assimilated form of Latin com "with, together with" (see com-) + aetas "age" (from PIE root *aiw- "vital force, life; long life, eternity") + adjectival suffix -aneus. Related: Coetaneously.

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combine (v.)

early 15c., "to associate, unite, join two or more things together" (transitive), from Old French combiner (14c.) and directly from Late Latin combinare "to unite, yoke together," from Latin com "with, together" (see com-) + bini "two by two," adverb from bi- "twice" (from PIE root *dwo- "two"). Intransitive sense "unite, coalesce, come together into one body" is from 1712. Related: Combinative; combined; combining.

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component (n.)

1640s, "constituent part or element" (earlier "one of a group of persons," 1560s), from Latin componentem (nominative componens), present participle of componere "to put together, to collect a whole from several parts," from com "with, together" (see com-) + ponere "to place" (see position (n.)). Related: Componential.

Meaning "mechanical part of a bicycle, automobile, etc." is from 1896. As an adjective, "constituent, entering into the composition of," from 1660s.

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commensurable (adj.)

"having a common measure" (as a yard and a foot, both of which may be measured by inches), 1550s, from Late Latin commensurabilis "having a common measure," from com "together, with" (see com-) + Latin mensurabilis "that can be measured," from mensurare "to measure," from Latin mensura "a measuring, a measurement; thing to measure by," from mensus, past participle of metiri "to measure," from PIE root *me- (2) "to measure."

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