Etymology
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tabagie (n.)

1819, from French tabagie (17c.), from tabac "tobacco" (see tobacco) + -age. A group of smokers who meet in club fashion; a "tobacco-parliament." In German, a Rauchkneipe.

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capital (n.3)

"head of a column or pillar," late 13c., from Anglo-French capitel, Old French chapitel (Modern French chapiteau), or directly from Latin capitellum "head of a column or pillar," literally "little head," diminutive of caput "head" (from PIE root *kaput- "head").

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sinciput (n.)

"forepart of the head, upper front part of the dome of the skull," 1570s, from Latin sinciput "head, brain," etymologically "half a head" (also used for "one of the smoked cheeks of a pig"); from semi- "half" (see semi-) + caput "head" (from PIE root *kaput- "head"). Opposed to the occiput "back of the head" (see occipital). Related: Sincipital.

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capitate (adj.)

"head-shaped" (in botany, etc.), 1660s, from Latin capitatus "headed," from caput "head" (from PIE root *kaput- "head").

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headroom (n.)

"space above the head," 1851, from head (n.) + room (n.).

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kerchief (n.)

"square piece of fabric folded and worn about the head," early 13c., kovrechief "piece of cloth used to cover part of the head," especially a woman's head-cloth or veil, from Anglo-French courchief, Old French couvrechief "a kerchief," literally "cover head," from couvrir "to cover" (see cover (v.)) + chief "head" (from Latin caput "head," from PIE root *kaput- "head"). From late 14c. as "piece of cloth used about the person" generally, for purposes other than covering the head; and from c. 1400 as "piece of cloth carried in the hand" to wipe the face, etc. (compare handkerchief).

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Athenaeum (n.)

1727, "temple dedicated to Athena," from Latinized form of Greek Athenaion "the temple of Athene," in ancient Athens, in which professors taught and actors or poets rehearsed; see Athena. The modern meaning "literary club-room or reading room" is from 1799; the sense of "literary or scientific club" is from 1807. These senses are based on the institutions founded by Hadrian at Rome and elsewhere dedicated to literary and scientific studies.

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headband (n.)

also Related: head-band, 1530s, from head (n.) + band (n.1).

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pill (v.1)

1736, "to dose on pills," from pill (n.). From 1882 as "to form into pills." In club slang, "to reject by vote, blackball" (1855). Related: Pilled; pilling.

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pinhead (n.)

also pin-head, "the head of a pin," 1660s, from pin (n.) + head (n.). From mid-15c. as the type of something small or a minuscule amount. Meaning "person of little intelligence" (and/or a small head) is by 1896. Related: Pinheaded

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