Etymology
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snobbery (n.)

"the class of snobs," 1833, from snob + -ery. Meaning "snobbishness" is from 1843.

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staging (n.)

"temporary structure or support," early 14c., verbal noun from stage (v.). As an adjective to designate "stopping place or assembly point," 1945.

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masses (n.)

"people of the lower class," 1836; plural of mass (n.1).

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vesicle (n.)

"small, bladder-like structure," early 15c., from French vesicule, from Latin vesicula "little blister," diminutive of vesica "bladder, blister" (see ventral).

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substructure (n.)

1726, "foundation, part of a building which supports another part," from sub- + structure (n.). Earlier in this sense was substruction (1620s). Related: Substructural.

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firewall (n.)

also fire-wall, 1851 as a physical wall meant to prevent the spread of fire in a structure, from fire (n.) + wall (n.). Computer sense (originally figurative) is by 1990.

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ice-house (n.)

"a structure, usually with double walls, packed between with sawdust or similar non-conducting material, used for the storage of ice," 1680s, from ice (n.) + house (n.).

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plebe (n.)

also pleb, "member of the lowest class at a U.S. military academy," 1833, probably a shortened form of plebeian "one of the lower class," which in Latin had also the short form plebs or plebes.

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cephalopod (n.)

one of a class of mollusks notable for having tentacles attached to a distinct head, 1825, from French cephalopode, from Modern Latin Cephalopoda (the class name), from Greek kephalē "head" (see cephalo-) + pod-, stem of pous "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot").

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pinnate (adj.)

"shaped like a feather; resembling a feather in structure," 1727, from Latin pinnatus "feathered, winged," from pinna "feather, wing" (from PIE root *pet- "to rush, to fly").

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