Etymology
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substantial (adj.)
mid-14c., "ample, sizeable," from Old French substantiel (13c.) and directly from Latin substantialis "having substance or reality, material," in Late Latin "pertaining to the substance or essence," from substantia "being, essence, material" (see substance). Meaning "existing, having real existence" is from late 14c. Meaning "involving an essential part or point" is early 15c. Related: Substantially.
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chemo- 

before vowels chem-, word-forming element denoting "relation to chemical action or chemicals," from combining form of chemical (adj.), used to form scientific compound words from c. 1900. In 19c., chemico- was used.

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Pb 

chemical abbreviation for "lead," from Latin plumbum "lead" (see plumb (n.)).

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dopamine 

compound organic chemical, 1959, from DOPA, the amino acid (from first letter of elements of dioxyphenylalanine), + amine.

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halide (n.)
a compound of a halogen and a metal radical, 1844, from Swedish (Berzelius, 1825), from halo- + chemical suffix -ide.
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toner (n.)
1888, agent noun from tone (v.). As a photography chemical, from 1920; in xerography, from 1954.
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porphyria (n.)

metabolic disorder, 1923, from porphyrin (1910), the name of the type of chemical which, in imbalance, causes it, from German porphyrin (1909), chemical name, from Greek porphyros "purple" (see purple) + -in (2). Some of the compounds are purple.

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naloxone (n.)

name of a chemical antagonistic to narcotics, 1964, from elements of N-allynoroxymorphone.

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petrochemical (adj.)

"of or pertaining to the chemistry of the formation and composition of rocks," 1913, from petro- (1) "rock" + chemical (adj.).

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Au 
chemical symbol for the element gold, from Latin aurum "gold" (see aureate).
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