Etymology
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dreariness (n.)

"state or character of being dreary," Old English dreorignys; see dreary + -ness.

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everyman (n.)
name of the leading character in a popular 15c. morality play; from every + man (n.).
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Struwwelpeter (n.)
German, name of a character in the children's book by Heinrich Hoffman (1809-1894). There was an English edition by 1848.
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sentience (n.)

1817, "faculty of sense; sentient character or state, feeling, consciousness, susceptibility to sensation;" see sentient + -ence. Related: Sentiency (1796).

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misanthropic (adj.)

"having the character of a misanthrope, hating mankind as a race," 1739, from misanthrope + -ic. Earlier was misanthropical (1620s).

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befitting (adj.)
"of a suitable kind or character, proper, becoming," 1560s, present-participle adjective from befit (q.v.). Related: Befittingly.
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chirosophy (n.)

"knowledge of character and possible future based on the lines and marks of the hand," 1885, from chiro- "the hand" + -sophy "knowledge."

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sauciness (n.)

"the character of being saucy; saucy language or conduct," 1540s, from saucy + -ness. Once (1550s) as sauceliness.

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pierrot (n.)

stock buffoonish character in French pantomime, also a popular character in masked balls, from French Pierrot, diminutive form of Pierre; considered a typical name of a French peasant. He has a whitened face, a costume white or with white stripes, large and loose, with vert long sleeves. The fem. form is Pierrette. Related: Pierrotic.

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nationalization (n.)

1801, "act of rendering national in character," from nationalize + -ation. Meaning "act of bringing (property) under control of the national government" is by 1864.

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