Etymology
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*keue- 

*keuə-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to swell," also "vault, hole."

It forms all or part of: accumulate; accumulation; cave; cavern; cavity; coeliac; church; codeine; coelacanth; coeliac; coelomate; concave; cumulate; cumulative; cumulus; enceinte; excavate; kirk; kymatology; Kyrie eleison.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit svayati "swells up, is strong;" Greek kyein "to swell," koilos "hollow, hollowed out, spacious, deep;" Latin cumulus "a heap, pile, mass, surplus;" Lithuanian šaunas "firm, solid, fit, capable;" Middle Irish cua "hollow;" Armenian soyl "cavity."

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outflow (n.)

1869, "act or fact of flowing out, a flowing out or forth;" 1875, "that which flows out," from out- + flow (n.).

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outbid (v.)

also out-bid, 1580s, "offer a higher price than," from out- + bid (v.). Related: Out-bidding; out-bidden. Middle English had utbidden "to summon (warriors), muster (an army," c. 1300, on the notion of "call out."

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extract (v.)

"to draw out, withdraw, take or get out, pull out or remove from a fixed position, literally or figuratively," late 15c., from Latin extractus, past participle of extrahere "draw out," from ex "out, out of" (see ex-) + trahere "to draw" (see tract (n.1)). Related: Extracted; extracting.

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extrude (v.)

of things, "to thrust out; force, press, or crowd out; expel," 1560s, from Latin extrudere "to thrust out, drive away," from ex "out, out of" (see ex-) + trudere "to thrust, push," from PIE *treud- "to press, push, squeeze" (see threat). Related: Extruded; extruding.

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exclusion (n.)

"act of shutting out; non-inclusion," c. 1400, exclusioun, from Latin exclusionem (nominative exclusio) "a shutting out," noun of action from past-participle stem of excludere "keep out, shut out," from ex "out" (see ex-) + claudere "to close, shut" (see close (v.)).

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outdated (adj.)

also out-dated, "grown obsolete," 1590s, from out- + past participle of date (v.1). Out-of-date is attested from 1610s. The verb, out-date "make obsolete" is by 1640s, perhaps 1590s.

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eject (v.)

mid-15c., from Latin eiectus "thrown out," past participle of eicere "throw out, cast out, thrust out; drive into exile, expel, drive away," from ex "out" (see ex-) + -icere, combining form of iacere "to throw" (from PIE root *ye- "to throw, impel"). Related: Ejected; ejecting. Ejecta "matter thrown out by a volcano" is from 1851.

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effluence (n.)

c. 1600, "that which flows out;" 1620s, "act of flowing out," from Late Latin effluentia, from Latin effluentem (nominative effluens) "flowing out," present participle of effluere "to flow out," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + fluere "to flow" (see fluent). Related: Effluency.

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outen (v.)

"put out, extinguish," especially in outen the light, 1916, American English dialectal; see out (adv.) + -en (1). An idiom in Pennsylvania German. In English, out (v.) "to put out" is attested from c. 1500.

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