Etymology
Advertisement
plump (v.2)

1530s, "to become plump," from plump (adj.). Transitive meaning "to plump (something) up, to cause to swell" is from 1530s. Related: Plumped; plumping.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
depressurize (v.)

"cause a drop in the pressure of a gas in a certain space," 1944; see de- + pressurize. Related: Depressurized; depressurizing; depressurization.

Related entries & more 
radicalize (v.)

1820, transitive, "make radical, cause to conform to radical ideals," from radical (adj.) + -ize. Intransitive sense of "become radical" is by 1828. Related: Radicalized; radicalizing.

Related entries & more 
feverous (adj.)
late 14c., "having a fever; characteristic of fever," from fever + -ous or from Old French fievrous. Meaning "apt to cause fever" is from 1620s. Related: Feverously.
Related entries & more 
jussive (adj.)

"of a grammatical mode expressing command," 1825, with -ive + Latin iuss-, past participle stem of iubere "to bid, command, to order," from PIE root *ioudh- "to cause to move" (cognates: Sanskrit yudhya- "to fight," yodha- "to rebel;" Greek hysmine "battle, fight;" Lithuanian judėti "to move" (intransitive), judus "belligerent"). The sense evolution in Latin was from "cause to move" to "order." As a noun from 1836.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
suspend (v.)
c. 1300, "to bar or exclude temporarily from some function or privilege;" also "to set aside (a law, etc.), to cause to cease for a time," from Old French sospendre "remove from office; hang up" (12c.), or directly from Latin suspendere "to hang up, kill by hanging; make uncertain, render doubtful; stay, stop, interrupt, set aside temporarily," from assimilated form of sub "up from under" (see sub-) + pendere "to hang, cause to hang; weigh" (from PIE root *(s)pen- "to draw, stretch, spin"). In English, the literal sense of "to cause to hang by a support from above" is recorded from mid-15c. Related: Suspended; suspending.
Related entries & more 
peal (v.)

1630s, "sound loudly, resound" (intransitive), from peal (n.). Transitive sense of "to utter or cause to ring loudly and sonorously" is by 1714. Related: Pealed; pealing.

Related entries & more 
reignite (v.)

also re-ignite, "catch fire again; cause to catch fire again," 1823, from re- "again" + ignite. Related: Reignited; reigniting; reignition.

Related entries & more 
damage (v.)
Origin and meaning of damage

"cause damage to, hurt, injure, harm," early 14c., from Old French damagier, from damage "loss caused by injury" (see damage (n.)). Related: Damaged; damaging.

Related entries & more 
march (v.)

"to walk with measured steps or a regular tread," either individually or as a body, early 15c., from Old French marcher "to stride, march, walk," originally "to trample, tread underfoot," a word of uncertain origin. Perhaps from Frankish *markon or some other Germanic source related to Middle English march (n.) "borderland" (see march (n.2)). Or possibly from Gallo-Roman *marcare, from Latin marcus "hammer," via notion of "tramping the feet."

The transitive meaning "cause to march, cause to move in military order" is from 1590s. Sense of "cause (someone) to go (somewhere) at one's command" is by 1884. Related: Marched; marching. Marching band is attested by 1852. Italian marciare, Spanish marchar are said to be from French.

Related entries & more 

Page 6