Etymology
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so-so (adv.)

mid-15c., "moderately well," 1520s, "indifferently, neither too poorly nor too well," from so (adv.), which is attested from mid-13c. in the sense "in this state or condition." As an adjective, "mediocre, neither too good nor too bad," 1540s. So-and-so is from 1596 meaning "something unspecified;" first recorded 1897 as a euphemistic term of abuse. In 17c.-18c. So, so also could be colloquially a mere introductory phrase.

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imperialist (n.)

c. 1600, "an adherent of an emperor or the imperial cause," such as the emperor of Germany (in the Thirty Years War), France, China, etc., probably modeled on French impérialiste (early 16c.); from imperial + -ist. The shift in meaning to "advocate of imperialism" (1893) came via the British Empire, which involved a worldwide colonial system. See imperialism. As a term of abuse in communist circles, attested by 1918. As an adjective by 1816.

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Machiavellian (adj.)

"cunning, deceitful, habitually duplicitous, unscrupulous, destitute of political morality," 1570s, from Niccolo Machiavelli (1469-1527), Florentine statesman and author of "Il Principe," a work advising rulers to place advantage above morality. A word of abuse in English well before his works were translated ("The Discourses" in 1636, "The Prince" in 1640), in part because his books were Indexed by the Church, in part because of French attacks on him (such as Gentillet's, translated into English 1602). Related: Machiavellianism.

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Eros (n.)

god of love, late 14c., from Greek eros (plural erotes), "god or personification of love; (carnal) love," from eran, eramai, erasthai "to desire," which is of uncertain origin. Beekes suggests it is from Pre-Greek.

The Freudian sense of "urge to self-preservation and sexual pleasure" is from 1922. Ancient Greek distinguished four ways of love: erao "to be in love with, to desire passionately or sexually;" phileo "have affection for;" agapao "have regard for, be contented with;" and stergo, used especially of the love of parents and children or a ruler and his subjects.

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lacerate (v.)

"to tear roughly," early 15c., from Latin laceratus, past participle of lacerare "tear to pieces, mangle," figuratively, "to slander, censure, abuse," from lacer "torn, mangled," from PIE root *lek- "to rend, tear" (source also of Greek lakis "tatter, rag," lakizein "to tear to pieces;" Latin lacinia "flap of a garment," lancinare "to pierce, stab;" Russian lochma "rag, tatter, scrap;" Albanian l'akur "naked"). Figurative sense in English is from 1640s. Related: Lacerated; lacerating.

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lampoon (n.)

"A personal satire; abuse; censure written not to reform but to vex" [Johnson], 1640s, from French lampon (17c.), a word of unknown origin, said by French etymologists to be from lampons "let us drink," which is said to have been a popular refrain for scurrilous songs, in which case it would be originally a drinking song. French lampons is from lamper "to drink, guzzle," a nasalized form of laper "to lap," from a Germanic source akin to lap (v.). Also see -oon.

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run-down (adj.)

1866, of persons, "to have the health or strength reduced," from the verbal phrase; see run (v.) + down (adv.). From 1896 of places, "dilapidated, shabby, seedy;" by 1894 of clocks, etc., "completely unwound." The earliest sense is "oppressed" (1680s). Compare rundown (n.).

The verbal phrase run down as "have the motive power exhausted" (of clocks, etc.) is by 1761; of persons, etc., "become weak or exhausted," by 1828. To run (something or someone) down "disparage, abuse" is by 1660s. 

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nag (n.)

"old horse," c. 1400, nagge "small riding horse, pony," a word of unknown origin, perhaps related to Dutch negge, neg (but these are more recent than the English word), perhaps related in either case to imitative neigh. The term of abuse "a worthless person," often of a woman, is a transferred sense, first recorded 1590s. For "one who annoys by scolding" (by 1925) see nag (v.).

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reproach (v.)

mid-14c., reprochen, "charge with a fault, censure severely," from Anglo-French repruchier, Old French reprochier "upbraid, blame, accuse, speak ill of," from reproche "blame, shame, disgrace" (see reproach (n.)). The sense of "rebuke, revile, abuse" is from 1510s. Related: Reproached; reproaching; reproachable.

To reproach a person is to lay blame upon him in direct address, and with feeling, to endeavor to shame him with what he has done. [Century Dictionary]
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fellowship (n.)

c. 1200, feolahschipe "companionship," from fellow + -ship. Sense of "a body of companions" is from late 13c. Meaning "spirit of comradeship, friendliness" is from late 14c. As a state of privilege in English colleges, from 1530s. In Middle English it was at times a euphemism for "sexual intercourse" (carnal fellowship).

To fellowship with is to hold communion with; to unite with in doctrine and discipline. This barbarism now appears with disgusting frequency in the reports of ecclesiastical conventions, and in the religious newspapers generally. [Bartlett, "Dictionary of Americanisms," 1848]

But Chaucer and Wyclif used it as a verb in Middle English, "to have fellowship with."

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