Etymology
Advertisement
Cantonese (n.)

1816 (n.), "native or inhabitant of Canton;" 1840 (adj.) "of or pertaining to Canton;" from Canton (q.v.) + -ese.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Cantabria 

ancient region in northern Spain, said to come from a Celtic base *kant- meaning "rock" or "rocky." Related: Cantabrian.

Related entries & more 
cantharides (n.)

late 14c., cantaride, type of beetle (the "Spanish fly"), especially as dried, ground up, and used medicinally to raise blisters, from Latin plural of cantharis, from Greek kantharis "blister-fly, a kind of beetle." Beekes says this is a derivative of kantharos, also the name of a kind of beetle, for which there is no good etymology. Their use (taken internally) as a sexual stimulant is attested by c. 1600. Related: Cantharic.

Related entries & more 
canticle (n.)

"short hymn," early 13c., from Latin canticulum "a little song," diminutive of canticum "song" (also a scene in Roman comedy enacted by one person and accompanied by music and dancing), from cantus "song, a singing; bird-song," from past participle stem of canere "to sing" (from PIE root *kan- "to sing").

Related entries & more 
cantabile (adj.)

of music, "executed in the style of a song, smooth and flowing," 1724, from Italian, literally "singable, that can be sung," from cantare "to sing" (from PIE root *kan- "to sing").

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Cantabrigian (adj.)

"pertaining to Cambridge," 1540s, from Medieval Latin Cantabrigia (see Cambridge) + -an. The shortened form Cantab is attested from 1750 as "member or graduate of the University of Cambridge."

Related entries & more 
cantatrice (n.)

"female professional singer," 1803, from French cantatrice, from Italian, from Latin cantatrix, fem. of cantator "a singer," from cantare "to sing" (from PIE root *kan- "to sing").

Related entries & more 
canteen (n.)

1744 (in a recollection from c. 1710), "store in a military camp," from French cantine "sutler's shop" (17c.), from Italian cantina "wine cellar, vault," diminutive of canto "a side, corner, angle." Thus it is perhaps another descendant of the many meanings that were attached to Latin canto "corner;" in this case, perhaps "corner for storage." A Gaulish origin also has been proposed.

The sense of "refreshment room at a military base" (1803) was extended to schools, etc. by 1870. The meaning "small tin for water or liquor, carried by soldiers on the march, campers, etc." is from 1744, from a sense in French.

Related entries & more 
canter (v.)

of horses, "move with a moderate or easy gallop," 1706, from a contraction of canterbury (v.), 1670s, from Canterbury pace (1630s), "easy pace at which pilgrims ride to Canterbury" (q.v.). Related: Cantered; cantering.

Related entries & more 
cantonment (n.)

1756, "military quarters, part of a town assigned to a particular regiment," from French cantonnement, from cantonner "to divide into cantons" (14c.), from canton "angle, corner" (see canton). The meaning "action of quartering troops" is from 1757.

Related entries & more 

Page 6