Etymology
Advertisement
interpretable (adj.)
1610s, from Late Latin interpretabilis "that can be explained or translated," from Latin interpretari "explain, expound, understand" (see interpret).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
fallible (adj.)
early 15c., from Medieval Latin fallibilis "liable to err, deceitful," literally "that can be deceived," from Latin fallere "deceive" (see fail (v.)).
Related entries & more 
portable (adj.)

"capable of being carried from place to place," early 15c., from French portable "that can be carried," from Late Latin portabilis "that can be carried," from Latin portare "to carry" (from PIE root *per- (2) "to lead, pass over"). An earlier word for "designed to be carried from place to place" was portatif (late 14c.), from Old French. Related: Portability.

Related entries & more 
incalculable (adj.)

"incapable of being reckoned," 1772, from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + calculable "that can be counted" (see calculate). Related: Incalculably; incalculability.

Related entries & more 
advisable (adj.)
1640s, "prudent, expedient," from advise (v.) + -able (q.v.). It also can mean "open to advice" (1660s), but this is rare.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
chauvinist (n.)

1863, from French chauviniste, from Chauvin (see chauvinism) + -ist. Related: Chauvinistic (1870).

The Chauvinist is a man who can only express his patriotic feelings in terms of hatred to other countries. There are still to be found in France certain people who can only show the excellence of French institutions by exhibiting the wickedness of the English. [The Home and Foreign Review, October 1863]
Related entries & more 
clock-radio (n.)

"combined bedside radio and alarm clock which can be set to turn on the radio instead of sounding the alarm," 1946, from clock (n.1) + radio (n.).

Related entries & more 
Cullen 

surname, c. 1300, in some uses it represents an Englishing of Cologne, the city in Germany. As a surname it can be this or from Cullen, Banffshire.

Related entries & more 
expendable (adj.)

1805, "that can be consumed by use," from expend + -able. By 1942 in the military sense, especially of men, "that may be sacrificed to attain an objective."

Related entries & more 
positive (n.)

1520s, originally in grammar, from positive (adj.). Sense of "that which can be affirmed, reality" is from 1610s. Sense in photography (opposite of negative (n.)) is by 1853.

Related entries & more 

Page 6