Etymology
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chaeto- 

before vowels chaet-, word-forming element meaning "hair," also, in scientific use, "spine, bristle," from Latinized form of Greek khaite "long, loose, flowing hair" (of persons, also of horses, lions), from an old PIE word for "hair, mane," source also of Avestan gaesa- "curly hair," gaesu- "'curly haired," Modern Persian ges "hair that hangs down, curls;" Middle Irish gaiset "bristly hair."

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spit (n.2)
"sharp-pointed rod for roasting meat," late Old English spitu "a spit," from Proto-Germanic *spituz (source also of Middle Dutch and Dutch spit, Swedish spett (which perhaps is from Low German), Old High German spiz, German Spieß "roasting spit," German spitz "pointed"), from PIE *spei- "sharp point" (see spike (n.1)). This is also the source of the word meaning "sandy point" (1670s). Old French espois, Spanish espeto "spit" are Germanic loan-words. The verb meaning "to put on a spit" is recorded from c. 1200.
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pick (n.2)

a name of pointed instruments of various kinds, and also other noun senses, in most cases from pick (v.) but in some perhaps with some influence of pick (n.1). Meaning "a blow with a pointed instrument" is from mid-15c; the sense in toothpick is from late 15c. The meaning "plectrum for a guitar, lute, etc." is from 1895. As a type of basketball block, from 1951. The meaning "right of selection, first choice" is by 1772, hence "choicest part or example" (by 1858). Meaning "instrument for picking locks" is by 1890.

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Huron 
North American lake, named for the native people who lived nearby, whose name is attested in English from 1650s, from French, from obsolete French huron "bristle-haired" (the French word frequently was used in reference to head-dresses, and that might be its original sense here), from Old French huré "bristly, unkempt, shaggy," which is of uncertain origin, but French sources indicate it probably is from Germanic.
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brochure (n.)
"pamphlet; short written work stitched together," 1748, from French brochure "a stitched work," from brocher "to stitch" (sheets together), from Old French brochier "to prick, jab, pierce," from broche "pointed tool, awl" (see broach (n.)).
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cuspid (n.)

"a point," 1743, from Latin cuspis (genitive cuspidis) "point, pointed end," a word of unknown origin. In English from 1640s as cuspis. As "a cuspid tooth" by 1828. Related: Cuspidate (adj.), which is attested from 1690s; cuspidal.

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picket (v.)

1745, "to enclose or fortify with pointed stakes," from picket (n.). Meaning "to place or post as a guard of observation" is by 1775. The sense in labor strikes, protests, etc., is attested from 1867. Related: Picketed; picketing.

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steak (n.)
mid-15c., "thick slice of meat cut for roasting," probably from a Scandinavian source such as Old Norse steik "roast meat," related to steikja "to roast on a spit," and ultimately meaning "something stuck" (on a spit), from Proto-Germanic *staiko-, from PIE *steig- "to stick; pointed" (see stick (v.)).
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vandyke (n.)
"short, pointed beard," 1894, from the style shown on portraits by Flemish painter Anton Van Dyck (1599-1641); earlier "a type of collar with a deep cut edge" (1755) also from a style depicted in his paintings.
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pen (n.2)

"small enclosure for domestic animals," Old English penn, penne, a word of uncertain origin, perhaps related to Old English pinn "pin, peg" (see pin (n.)) on the notion of a bolted gate or else "structure made of pointed stakes."

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