Etymology
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convex (adj.)

"curved like a circle or sphere when viewed from outside," 1570s, from French convexe, from Latin convexus "vaulted, arched," past participle of convehere "to bring together," from assimilated form of com "with, together," or "thoroughly" (see com-) + vehere "to bring, carry, convey" (from PIE root *wegh- "to go, move, transport in a vehicle").

Possibly the notion is of vaults "carried together" to meet at the point of a roof. Related: Convexity. Convex lens is from 1822.

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educate (v.)
Origin and meaning of educate

mid-15c., educaten, "bring up (children), to train," from Latin educatus, past participle of educare "bring up, rear, educate" (source also of Italian educare, Spanish educar, French éduquer), which is a frequentative of or otherwise related to educere "bring out, lead forth," from ex- "out" (see ex-) + ducere "to lead," from PIE root *deuk- "to lead." Meaning "provide schooling" is first attested 1580s. Related: Educated; educating.

According to "Century Dictionary," educere, of a child, is "usually with reference to bodily nurture or support, while educare refers more frequently to the mind," and, "There is no authority for the common statement that the primary sense of education is to 'draw out or unfold the powers of the mind.'"

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protraction (n.)

mid-15c., protraccioun, "drawing or writing of numbers," from late Old French protraction (15c.) and directly from Late Latin protractionem (nominative protractio) "a drawing out or lengthening," noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin protrahere "to draw forward, draw out, bring forth;" figuratively "bring to light, reveal, expose," from pro "forward" (see pro-) + trahere "to draw" (see tract (n.1)). Meaning "act of drawing out or prolonging" is from 1530s.

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nurse (v.)

1530s, "to suckle (an infant), nourish at the breast;" 1520s in the passive sense, "to bring up" (a child); alteration of Middle English nurshen, norishen "to supply with food and drink, feed; bring up, nurture" (c. 1300; see nourish), in part by influence of nurse (n.1).  From 1540s as "promote growth or vigor in, encourage." Sense of "tend to in sickness or infirmity" is recorded by 1736. Related: Nursed; nursing.

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mature (v.)

c. 1400, maturen, "encourage suppuration;" mid-15c., of plants, "cause to ripen, bring to maturity," from Latin mātūrare "to ripen, bring to maturity," from mātūrus "ripe, timely, early," related to māne "early, of the morning," from PIE *meh-tu- "ripeness." De Vaan writes that "The root is probably the same as in mānus 'good'." Intransitive sense of "come to a state of ripeness, become ripe or perfect" is from 1650s. The financial sense of "reach the time for payment" is by 1861. Related: Matured; maturing.

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important (adj.)

mid-15c., "significant, of much import, bearing weight or consequence," from Medieval Latin importantem (nominative importans) "important, momentous," present-participle adjective from importare "be significant in," from Latin importare "bring in, convey, bring in from abroad," from assimilated form of in- "into, in" (from PIE root *en "in") + portare "to carry," from PIE root *per- (2) "to lead, pass over." The meaning "pretentious, pompous" is from 1713. Related: Importantly. Compare import (v.) and (n.).

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perfect (v.)

"to bring to full development, finish or complete so as to leave nothing wanting," late 14c., parfiten, from perfect (adj.). Related: Perfected; perfecting.

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anesthetize (v.)
"bring under the influence of an anesthetic," 1848, from Latinized form of Greek anaisthetos "insensate, without feeling" (see anesthesia) + -ize. Related: Anesthetized; anesthetizing; anesthetization.
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rapportage (n.)

"the describing of events in writing," 1898, a French word in English, from French rapportage, literally "tale-telling," from rapporter "to bring back; refer to" (see rapport).

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heap (v.)
Old English heapian "collect, heap up, bring together;" from heap (n.). Related: Heaped; heaping. Compare Old High German houfon, German haufen "to heap," also a verb from a noun.
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