Etymology
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suspension (n.)

early 15c., "a temporary halting or deprivation," from Latin suspensionem (nominative suspensio) "the act or state of hanging up, a vaulting," noun of action, from past-participle stem of suspendere "to hang up, cause to hang, suspend," from assimilated form of sub "up from under" (see sub-) + pendere "to hang, cause to hang; weigh" (from PIE root *(s)pen- "to draw, stretch, spin"). Suspension of disbelief is from Coleridge:

A semblance of truth sufficient to procure for these shadows of imagination that willing suspension of disbelief for the moment, which constitutes poetic faith. ["Biographia Literaria," 1817]

Meaning "action of hanging by a support from above" is attested from 1540s. Meaning "particles suspended in liquid without dissolving" is from 1707. Suspension-bridge is recorded by 1819 (earlier suspended bridge, 1796).

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concertina (n.)

"portable, accordion-like musical instrument," 1835, from concert + fem. ending -ina. Invented 1829 by English inventor Professor Charles Wheatstone (who also invented the stereoscope and the Wheatstone bridge). Concertina wire attested by 1917, so called from similarity to the musical instrument.

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dummy (n.)

1590s, "mute person," from dumb (adj.) + -y (3). Extended by 1845 to "figure representing a person," hence "counterfeit object, something that imitates a reality for mechanical purposes." In card games (originally whist, later bridge) "exposed hand of cards placed face-up," by 1736. Meaning "dolt, blockhead" is from 1796.

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overpopulation (n.)

also over-population, "excess of population," 1807, from over- + population. Malthus (1798) had over-populousness.

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overking (n.)

also over-king, "a king who rules over other kings or princes," late 12c., from over- + king (n.).

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overshoe (n.)

also over-shoe, "a shoe worn over another," especially "an outer waterproof shoe," 1829, from over- + shoe (n.). Related: Overshoes.

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overlap (v.)

"to lap or fold over, to partially extend over, extend so as to rest or lie upon," 1726; see over- + lap (v.2). Verbal phrase lap over "extend beyond" is recorded from 1630s. Related: Overlapped; overlapping.

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overexcite (v.)

also over-excite, "excite unduly or excessively," 1708 (implied in over-excited), from over- + excite. Related: Overexciting.

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overindulgence (n.)

also over-indulgence, "excessive indulgence," 1630s, from over- + indulgence. First attested in Donne (over-indulgency). Related: Overindulgent.

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takeover (n.)
1917, "an act of taking over," from verbal phrase take over (1884), from take (v.) + over (adv.). Attested from 1958 in the corporate sense.
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