Etymology
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acquaint (v.)

early 13c., "make oneself known" (reflexive, now obsolete); early 14c., "to gain for oneself personal knowledge of," from Old French acointer "make known; make or seek acquaintance of," from Vulgar Latin *accognitare "to make known," from Latin accognitus "acquainted with," past participle of accognoscere "know well," from ad "to" (see ad-) + cognitus, past participle of cognoscere "come to know" (see cognizance).

Meaning "to inform (someone of something), furnish with knowledge or information" is from 1550s. Related: Acquainted; acquainting.

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self-glorification (n.)

"exaltation of oneself," 1826, from self- + glorification. Earlier was self-gloriation (1670s).

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Ira 

masc. proper name, from Hebrew, literally "watchful," from stem of 'ur "to awake, to rouse oneself."

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anorexia (n.)

1590s, "morbid want of appetite," Modern Latin, from Greek anorexia, from an- "without" (see an- (1)) + orexis "appetite, desire," from oregein "to desire, long for," literally "reach out (one's hand), stretch oneself, stretch out for" (from PIE root *reg- "move in a straight line") + abstract noun ending -ia. In current use, often short for anorexia nervosa.

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self-appointed (adj.)

"appointed or nominated by oneself," 1750, from self- + appointed.

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comeuppance (n.)

also comeupance, "one's deserts, reversal or punishment that one deserves," 1859, presumably it is rooted in the same notion in the verbal phrase come up "present oneself for judgment before a tribunal" (see come + up (adv.)) + -ance.

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amass (v.)

late 15c., "to heap up for oneself," from Old French amasser "bring together, assemble, accumulate" (12c.), from à "to" (see ad-) + masser, from masse "lump, heap, pile" (from PIE root *mag- "to knead, fashion, fit"). Related: Amassed; amassing; amassable.

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garnish (v.)

late 14c., "to decorate, adorn, beautify," also in Middle English "equip (a place) for defense; arm (oneself) for battle; prepare to defend," from Old French garniss-, present-participle stem of garnir "provide, furnish; fortify, reinforce" (11c.), from Frankish *warnjan, from Proto-Germanic *warnon "be cautious, guard, provide for" (source also of Old High German warnon "to take heed," Old English warnian "to take warning, beware;" see warn), from PIE root *wer- (4) "to cover."

Sense evolution is from "arm oneself" to "fit out" to "embellish," which was the earliest meaning in English. Culinary sense of "to decorate a dish for the table" predominated after c. 1700. Older meaning survives in legal sense of "to warn or serve notice of attachment of funds" (1570s). Related: Garnished; garnishing.

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self-deprecating (adj.)

"marked by expressed disapproval of oneself," 1835, from self- + deprecating (see deprecate).

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allocentric (adj.)

"concentrating on the other rather than oneself," 1927, from allo- "other" + -centric.

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