Etymology
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foraminous (adj.)

"full of holes," 1620s, from Late Latin foraminosus, from Latin foramen "hole, opening" (from PIE root *bhorh- "hole").

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burrow (n.)

"rabbit-hole, fox-hole, hole in the ground excavated by an animal as a refuge or habitation," c. 1300, borewe, a collateral form of Old English burgh "stronghold, fortress" (see borough); influenced by bergh "hill" and berwen "to defend, take refuge."

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foramen (n.)

plural foramina, 1670s, from Latin foramen "hole, opening, aperture, orifice," from forare "to pierce" (from PIE root *bhorh- "hole").

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manhole (n.)

also man-hole, "hole or opening in a floor, pavement, etc., through which a person may pass to gain access to certain parts for cleaning or repairing," 1793, from man (n.) + hole (n.).

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blackness (n.)

"quality of being black; black color," late 14c., from black (adj.) + -ness.

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bushing (n.)

"metal sleeve fitted into a machine or hole," 1839, from gerundive of bush (n.) "metal lining of the axle hole of a wheel or touch hole of a gun" (1560s), which is from Middle Dutch busse "box" (cognate with the second element in blunderbuss). Bush-metal "hard brass, gun-metal" is attested from 1847.

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sinkhole (n.)

also sink-hole, mid-15c., "sewage pit, hole for foul liquids to pass through," from sink (n.) + hole (n.). Also sink-fall. As a geological phenomenon, "cavity formed in the earth in limestone regions by underground erosion," by 1780, from sink (v.).

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blacking (n.)

1570s, "thing which makes (something else) black;" c. 1600, "action of making black," verbal noun from black (v.).

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melano- 

word-forming element meaning "black," from Greek melano-, combining form of melas (genitive melanos) "black, dark, murky,"probably from a PIE root *melh-"black, of darkish color" (source also of Sanskrit malinah "dirty, stained, black," Lithuanian mėlynas"blue," Latin mulleus "reddish"). 

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blackish (adj.)

"somewhat black, moderately dark," mid-15c., of precious stones and sick bodies, from black (adj.) + -ish.

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