Etymology
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feminism (n.)
1851, "qualities of females;" 1895, "advocacy of women's rights;" from French féminisme (1837); see feminine + -ism. Also, in biology, "development of female secondary sexual characteristics in a male" (1875).
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asexual (adj.)
1829, as a term in biology, "having no sex or sexual system," a hybrid from a- (3) "not" + sexual. In general contexts, "wanting sexuality, being of or referring to neither sex," attested from 1896.
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reticulum (n.)

1650s, "second stomach of a ruminant" (so called from the folds of the membrane), from Latin reticulum "a little net" (see rete). The word was later given various uses in biology, cytology, histology, etc., and made a southern constellation by La Caille (1763).

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anencephalic (adj.)

"having no brain" (biology), 1821, with -ic + Latinized form of Greek anenkephalos, from an- "not, without" (see an- (1)) + enkephalos "brain," "the brain," literally "within the head," from en "in" (see en- (2)) + kephalē "head;" see cephalo-. Related: Anencephalous (1834); anencephalia; anencephaly.

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-a (2)
nominative neuter plural ending of certain nouns and adjectives in Latin and Greek that have been adopted into English (phenomena, data, media, criteria, etc.). It also is common in biology in Modern Latin formations of class names (Mammalia, Reptilia, Crustacea).
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plasm (n.)

1610s, "mold or matrix in which anything is cast or formed to a particular shape" (a sense now obsolete); see plasma. In biology, the meaning "living matter of a cell, protoplasm" is attested by 1864.

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biometry (n.)
1831, "calculation of life expectancy" (obsolete); see bio- + -metry. Coined by Whewell, popularized 1860s by T.S. Lambert. Later, "application of mathematics to the study of biology" (1894). Related: Biometer, used in various senses from 1830s; from 1865 as "life table," calculating the duration of life under given conditions.
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dyad (n.)

"the number two, two units treated as one," 1670s, from Latin dyad-, stem of dyas, from Greek dyas "the number two, a group of two," from duo "two" (from PIE root *dwo- "two"). Specific sense in chemistry ("a bivalent element") is by 1865; also used in biology, poetics, mathematics. Related: Dyadic.

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morph 

as a noun, in biology, "genetic variant of an animal," 1955; as a verb, in cinematic special effects, c. 1987, short for metamorphosis. Related: Morphed; morphing. Earlier it was a slang shortening of morphine (1912).

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endothermic (adj.)

1869, originally in chemistry, "causing, relating to, or requiring the absorption of heat," from French endothermique (1868, Berthelot); see endo- + thermal. By 1947 in biology, "dependent on or capable of the internal generation of heat; warm-blooded."

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