Etymology
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backwash (n.)

1861, "motion of a receding wave;" see back (adv.) + wash (v.). As "residue in a glass or bottle of beer after drinking most of it," by 1897.

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bareback (adj.)
"riding or performing on an unsaddled ('bare-backed') horse," 1560s, from bare (adj.) + back (n.).
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switchback (n.)
in reference to zig-zag railways, 1863, from switch (v.) + back (adv.). As an adjective from 1873.
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playback (n.)

"reproduction of a recording," 1929, from the verbal phrase; see play (v.) + back (adv.).

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wetback (n.)
"illegal Mexican immigrant to the U.S.," c. 1924, from wet (adj.) + back (n.); from notion of wading the Rio Grande.
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backtalk (n.)
also back-talk, "impertinent retort," 1833; see back (adv.) + talk (n.). Originally often used in literary attempts at Irish or Scottish idiom. To talk back "answer impudently or rudely" is from 1849.
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outback (n.)

"back-country, interior regions of Australia," 1907, Out Back, Australian English, originally an adverb, "out in the back settlements" (1878), from out (adv.) + back (adv.).

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backstabber (n.)
also back-stabber, in the figurative sense, 1839, from back (n.) + agent noun from stab (v.). The verb backstab in the figurative sense is from 1925. Related: Backstabbing.
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backgammon (n.)
board game for two persons, 1640s, baggammon, the second element from Middle English gamen, ancestor of game (n.); the first element (see back (adv.)) apparently is because pieces sometimes are forced to go "back." Known 13c.-17c. as tables.
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throwback (n.)
also throw-back, "reversion to an ancestral type or character," 1888, from throw (v.) + back (adv.); earlier it meant "a reverse in a course or progress, a relapse" (1856).
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