Etymology
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labonza (n.)
"belly," 1943, American English slang, probably from dialectal pronunciation of Italian la pancia "the belly," with the definite article absorbed, from Latin pantex (genitive panticis) "belly" (see paunch).
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Crohn's disease (n.)

" chronic inflammatory condition of the digestive tract," 1935, for U.S. pathologist Burrill Bernard Crohn, one of the team that wrote the article describing it in 1932.

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piece (v.)

c. 1400, pecen, "to mend (clothing) by adding pieces," from piece (n.1). Sense of "to join, unite or reunite, put together again" is from late 15c. Related: Pieced; piecing.

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Aldebaran 
bright star in Taurus, late 14c., from Arabic Al Dabaran "the follower" (of the Pleiades, which rise shortly before it does), from dabara "he followed." The al- is the Arabic definite article, "the."
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shroud (n.)
Old English scrud "a garment, clothing, dress," from West Germanic *skruthan, from Proto-Germanic *skrud- "cut" (source also of Old Norse skruð "shrouds of a ship, tackle, gear; furniture of a church," Danish, Swedish skrud "dress, attire"), from PIE *skreu- "to cut" (see shred (n.)).

Specific meaning "winding-sheet, cloth or sheet for burial," to which the word now is restricted, first attested 1560s. Sense of "strong rope supporting the mast of a ship" (mid-15c.) is from the notion of "clothing" a spar or mast; one without rigging was said to be naked.
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co-author (n.)

also coauthor, "one who writes (a book, journal article, etc.) along with another," 1850, from co- + author (n.). From 1948 as a verb. Related: Co-authored; co-authoring.

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editorial (adj.)
1741, "pertaining to an editor;" see editor + -al (2). Noun meaning "newspaper article by an editor," is from 1830, American English, from the adjective in reference to such writings (1802). Related: Editorially.
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Cassegrain (adj.)
also Cassegrainian, in reference to a type of reflecting telescope, 1813, named for 17c. French priest and teacher Laurent Cassegrain, who described it in a journal article in 1672.
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Mao (adj.)

1967 in reference to a simple style of clothing popularized in the West and based on dress in Communist China, from French, from name of Mao Tse-tung (1893-1976), Chinese communist leader.

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supermarket (n.)
1933, American English, from super- + market (n.). The 1933 reference is in an article that says the stores themselves began to open around 1931. An early word for a "superstore" was hypermarket (1967).
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